This Summer! the Top Ten By Year: 1990 zine


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For the first time, I’m making a Top Ten By Year zine as I work through my watchlist for said year. This is a totally different way of working for me, since in the past I’ve been made zines from years already finished or just finished. There’s a lot I’m not able to do yet because of films unseen, but I’m slowly working through ideas and making pages while rewatching and writing about films I know will be in my group of 10. I’m a long way off, but it’s exciting to have this process be part of my journey through 1990 as opposed to entirely reflective after the fact. By the end of my watchlist I should have a new zine ready to go. I am aiming for a release date in the first half of summer, but I’ll have more specifics in the Spring for anyone interested. In the meantime, please take a look at my Etsy page where I have 3 other movie zines currently for sale (1969 is sold out, sorry!)

Top Ten By Year: 1990 – Poll Results


Previous Top Ten By Year Polls: 1925, 1949, 1958, 19691978199219301982

Poll Rule Reminders: Participants could vote for up to 10 films; no more, but certainly less. Order was not required since it had no bearing on the results.

First off, thank you so much to everyone who voted! 1990 had more participants than any other poll! 335 people voted for 236 different films!

Already there’s something I have to point out. The previous poll was for the year 1949, where 289 people voted for 257 individual films — 21 more films than 1990. I can’t wrap my head around this. 1990, a year with considerably higher output quantity domestically and around the world, somehow gets less individual films voted for than 1949. Take from that what you will!

Taking into account the Internet oversaturation of lists/listicles, I hope it’s clear that this project is anything but tossed off. The Top Ten By Year Project is an effort to reclaim what I love about lists in the first place. Seeing what makes the collective top ten is a lot of fun, but may I direct your attention to the full breakdown of votes and the individual ballots? My hope with these polls is that, in addition to planting seeds of anticipation for the related posts to come (What I’ll Remember About the Films of 1949: A Love Letter, A Selection of Favorite Shots, and the Top Ten), they mainly serve as a resource for anyone looking for new films to watch whether it’s from seeing:

a. what ‘Film Twitter’ collectively loves
b. more importantly, the films towards the bottom of the list, the ones you’ve never heard of that are begging for (re)discovery.
c. the individual ballots from people whose taste and knowledge you value

BRIEF INITIAL THOUGHTS:
Much like The Third Man for 1949, Goodfellas was always going to take the top spot. Look at that gap between number 1 and number 2! Nothing could touch it.

Any poll from this era is going to be, on the whole, heavily driven by nostalgia and the films we grew up watching (in 1990 I was 3 years old). I could see the age in a lot of the submitted ballots, and it was really interesting to see the variations between lists that were made up of films like Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and Arachnophobia, lists with no nostalgia to be found, or, by far the the majority, lists which had a mix of both (I also realize that many who voted were not young or adolescent in 1990!). Total Recall, Edward Scissorhands, and Gremlins 2: The New Batch hit that sweet spot where many of us first saw them when we were young and they’ve remained favorites, both publicly and critically, ever since.

Over the years Gremlins 2: The New Batch has become commonly cited as Joe Dante’s best, building up a reputation as not only one of 1990’s best films but one of the crown jewels of the decade. And you can see here how widespread the love for it really is — it’s on every kind of list imaginable.

While the top 10 is maybe more US dominated (9 out of 10, sheesh) than any other poll I’ve conducted, I still think this is a great group of films. Considering 1990 is in the midst of the Hong Kong New Wave, I was hoping Days of Being Wild would make it to represent (even though Wong Kar-wai is sort of an anomoly within Hong Kong cinema) its prevalence but alas! The tie for #9 allowed To Sleep with Anger to sneak in, which made me so happy.

The biggest thing that jumped out at me was Joe Versus the Volcano. I’m gobsmacked by how many votes it got. Who Knew! I never hear people talk about it, but apparantly it’s important and formative to a lot of you! It came in 13th. 13th!!!!! I haven’t seen it yet, and I’d been excited to watch it, but now I’m so excited to finally catch up with it and see what this outpouring of love is all about.

Some more observations:

  • Darkman getting more votes than Dick Tracy
  • Wow, people love Tremors. I don’t really like Tremors! But besides all the votes it got, I had two people reply to me with essentially “Tremors and only Tremors, that is all”
  • Really pleased by the turnout for Pump Up the Volume
  • Huge in the day, unsurprisingly DOA here: Pretty Woman
  • Was expecting maybe a slight reappraisal of Bonfire of the Vanities, but nope, people still don’t care for it.
  • The lack of votes for Hardware is a crime!
  • Nobody has seen In the Cold of the Night, which I get because it only recently became available….but go watch In the Cold of the Night!
  • 9 votes for Sink or Swim!
  • Assumed The Hot Spot would get a few more votes because isn’t supposed to be a really underrated neo-noir? Well, apparantly it’s really underrated, because it only got 2 votes
  • I knew people loved Miami Blues, but I didn’t realize just how much. Between this and Tremors (and Henry and June), Fred Ward is getting a lot of love.
  • Exorcist III making the kind of showing it deserves
  • And of course, I’m thinking of things I probably need to add onto my watchlist. I’m watching stuff that got no votes, and there’s so much here I won’t be watching, but I definitely want to add a few to the pool, especially The Juniper Tree (which I’d known about but it somehow slipped by, and The Mind’s Eye!

All votes for Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer, Sweetie, Kiki’s Delivery Service, Alexandria Again and Forever, War of the Roses, The Fabulous Baker Boys, She-Devil, Parenthood, When Harry Met Sally, Drugstore Cowboy, Last Exit to Brooklyn, Manon des Sources, Too Beautiful for You, Born on the Fourth of July, Pont de Varsovia (Warsaw Bridge), Landscape in the Mist did not count towards the final tally. However, they remain included in the individual ballot listings.

Surprises? Disappointments? General thoughts? Tweet @ me your thoughts and comments!

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POLL RESULTS: TOP TEN BY YEAR: 1990 (* = female director or co-director)
1. Goodfellas (US / Scorsese) – 223 votes
2. Miller’s Crossing (US / Coen) – 149 votes
3. Wild at Heart (US / Lynch) – 114 votes
4. Total Recall (US / Verhoeven) – 110 votes
5. Close-Up (Iran / Kiarostami) – 101 votes
6. Gremlins 2: The New Batch (US / Dante) – 100 votes
7. Metropolitan (US / Stillman) – 78 votes
8. Edward Scissorhands (US / Burton) – 65 votes
9. TIEMisery (US / Reiner) – 62 votes
King of New York (US / Ferrara) – 62 votes
10. To Sleep with Anger (US / Burnett) – 61 votes

57 votes: *Paris is Burning (US / Livingston)
56 votes: Days of Being Wild (Hong Kong / Wong Kar-wai)
47 votes: Joe Versus the Volcano (US / Shanley)
44 votes: Tremors (US / Underwood)
42 votes: Trust (US / Hartley), The Grifters (US / Frears)
38 votes: Miami Blues (US / Armitage)
33 votes: Jacob’s Ladder (US / Lyne), The Hunt for Red October (US / McTiernan)
31 votes: Darkman (US / Raimi)
30 votes: The Exorcist III (US / Blatty)
29 votes: *An Angel at My Table (Australia / New Zealand / Campion), Cry-Baby (US / Waters), Home Alone (US / Canada / Columbus)
28 votes: Life is Sweet (UK / Leigh), Pump Up the Volume (US / Canada / Moyle)
27 votes: Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams (Japan / US / Kurosawa)
26 votes: Dick Tracy (US / Beatty)
25 votes: Bullet in the Head (Hong Kong / Woo)
23 votes: *Blue Steel (US / Bigelow), Quick Change (US / Franklin & Murray)
22 votes: Postcards from the Edge (US / Nichols)
21 votes: The Godfather Part III (US / Coppola)
20 votes: The Match Factory Girl (Finland / Sweden / Kaurismäki), Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead (UK / US / Stoppard)
19 votes: White Hunter, Black Heart (US / Eastwood), Slacker (US / Linklater)
18 votes: La Femme Nikita (France / Italy / Besson), Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down! (Spain / Almodovar)
17 votes: The Witches (UK / US / Roeg), Mo’ Better Blues (US / Lee)
16 votes: Dances with Wolves (US / Costner)
15 votes: Arachnophobia (US / Marshall)
14 votes: Ju Dou (China / Japan / Zhang & Yang)
13 votes: Reversal of Fortune (US / Schroeder), *Awakenings (US / Marshall), Die Hard 2: Die Harder (US / Harlin)
12 votes: The Reflecting Skin (UK / Canada / Ridley), Presumed Innocent (US / Pakula)
11 votes: After Dark, My Sweet (US / Foley), Mermaids (US / Benjamin), Ghost (US / Zucker), Back to the Future Part III (US / Zemeckis)
10 votes: Days of Thunder (US / Scott), State of Grace (US / Joanou), My Blue Heaven (US / Ross), Avalon (US / Levinson), Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (US / Barron)

9 votes: Hardware (UK / Stanley), Boiling Point (Japan / Kitano), The Nasty Girl (West Germany / Verhoeven), The Freshman (US / Bergman), *Sink or Swim (US / Friedrich), Frankenhooker (US / Henenlotter)

8 votes: *No Fear, No Die (France / Denis), Truly Madly Deeply (UK / Minghella), *Song of the Exile (Hong Kong / Taiwan / Hui), Internal Affairs (US / Figgis), Troll 2 (Italy / Fragasso)

7 votes: Texasville (US / Bogdanovich), Maniac Cop 2 (US / Lustig), Predator 2 (US / Hopkins), Nightbreed (US / Barker), Singapore Sling (Greece / Nikolaidis), *The Juniper Tree (Iceland / Keene), A Tale of Springtime (France / Rohmer), Vincent & Theo (France / Netherlands / Altman), Kindergarten Cop (US / Reitman), Alice (US / Allen)

6 votes: The Rescuers Down Under (US / Butoy & Gabriel), Archangel (Canada / Maddin), *Europa Europa (Germany / France / Holland), Begotten (US / Merhige), Central Park (US / Wiseman), Pretty Woman (US / Marshall)

5 votes: The Ambulance (US / Cohen), Tilaï (Burkina Faso / Ouédraogo), Longtime Companion (US / René), Henry & June (US / Kaufman), Robocop 2 (US / Kershner), Cyrano de Bergerac (France / Rappeneau), The Two Jakes (US / Nicholson), *American Dream (US / UK / Kopple)

4 votes: *Privilege (US / Rainer), The Sheltering Sky (UK / Bertolucci), Nouvelle Vague (France / Godard), Mountains of the Moon (US / Rafelson), Men Don’t Leave (US / Brickman), Love at Large (US / Rudolph), Flatliners (US / Schumacher), House Party (US / Hudlin), *Strangers in Good Company (Canada / Scott), I Love You to Death (US / Kasdan), Child’s Play 2 (US / Laffia), The Comfort of Strangers (US / Italy / Schrader), *Sanctus (US / Hammer)

3 votes: Lord of the Flies (US / Hook), Problem Child (US / Dugan), Spontaneous Combustion (US / Hooper), Revenge (US / Scott), The Russia House (US / Schepisi), The Krays (UK / Medak), Bonfire of the Vanities (US / De Palma), I Hired a Contract Killer (Finland / Sweden / Kaurismäki), Tales from the Darkside: The Movie (US / Harrison), It (US / Canada / Wallace), Blind Fury (US / Noyce), The Garden (UK / Jarman)

2 votes: All the Vermeers in New York (US / Jost), The Hot Spot (US / Hopper), The Mind’s Eye: A Computer Animation Odyssey (US / Nickman), A Moment of Romance (Hong Kong / Chan), Swan Lake: The Zone (Soviet Union / Ilyenko), How to Live in the German Federal Republic, (West Germany / Farocki) Introduction to the End of an Argument (Canada / Salloum & Suleiman), Quigley Down Under (Australia / US / Wincer), May Fools (France / Italy / Malle), Green Card (France / Australia / Weir), Grim Prairie Tales (US / Coe), No, or in the Vain Glory of Command (Portugal / de Oliveira), Q & A (US / Lumet), The Field (Ireland / Sheridan), Look Out Officer! (Hong Kong / Sze Yu Lau), Desperate Hours (US / Cimino), Mama (China / Zhang Yuan), Graffiti Bridge (US / Prince), Everybody Wins (US / Reisz), Mindwal, (US / Capra), DuckTales the Movie: Treasure of the Lost Lamp (US / Hathcock), Def by Temptation (US / Bond III),*Yum Yum Yum! A Taste of Cajun and Creole Cooking (US / Blank & Gosling), Hard to Kill (US / Malmuth), New York Portrait Part III (US / Hutton)

1 vote: I’m Dangerous Tonight (US / Hooper), Orpheus Descending (US / Hall), *Night Cries: A Rural Tragedy (Australia / Moffatt), Freeze Die Come to Life (Soviet Union / Kanevsky), The Golden Boat (US / Belgium / Ruiz), A Chinese Ghost Story II (Hong Kong / Ching Siu-tung), House of Cards (TV show), Home Stories (West Germany / Muller & Schaefer), Twilight (Hungary / Fehér), The Second Circle (Soviet Union / Sokurov), Briar Rose or The Sleeping Beauty (Czechoslovakia / Japan / Kawamoto), Mister Johnson (US / Beresford), Prom Night III: The Last Kiss (Canada / Oliver), The Guardian (1990 / Friedkin), Hamlet (US / UK / Zefferelli), The Disenchanted (France / Jacquot), A Shock to the System (US / Egleson), *Impulse (US / Locke), *Cezanne (France / Hulliet & Straub), The Rookie (US / Eastwood), Cat in the Brain (Italy / Fulci), The Spirit of 76 (US / Rainer), Where the Heart Is (US / Boorman), Mediator (Soviet Union / Potapov), Boris Gudunov (UK / Burton), Punk Vacation (US / Lewis), Taking Care of Business (US / Hiller), Spaced Invaders (US / Johnson), Made in Hollywood (US / Yonemoto), *Mirror Mirror (US / Sargenti), Rockula (US / Bercovivi), Demon Wind (US / Moore), Pledge Night (US / Ziller), Rocky V (US / Avildsen), Lionheart (US / Lettich), Death Warrant (US / Sarafian), Another 48 Hrs. (US / Hill), Without You I’m Nothing (US / Boskovich), The Narrow Margin (US / Hyams), Psycho IV: The Beginning (US / Garris), Mr. Destiny (US / Orr), Larks on a String (Czechoslavakia / Menzel, shot in 1969), *The Asthenic Syndrom (Soviet Union / Muratova), Corps perdus (France / Argentina / de Gregorio), Artificial Paradise (Yugoslavia / Godina), Nostos: The Return (Italy / Piavoli), The Vampire Family (Soviet Union / Klimov & Shavlak), In Memory of the Day Passed By (Soviet Union / Bartas), Children of Hotel America (Lithuania / Banionis), Treasure of the Bitch Islands (France / Portugal / Ossang), Venus (Japan / Ito), Leatherface: Texas Chainsaw Massacre III (US / Burr), In the Cold of the Night (US / Mastorakis), *Unspeakable Acts (US / Otto), The Death King (West Germany / Buttgereit), Horse and Woman and Dog (Japan / Sato), The Adventures of Ford Fairlaine (US / Harlin), Michael Jordan’s Playground (US / Snyder), Tiger Cage II (Hong Kong / Yuen Woo-ping), Ernest Goes to Jail (US / Cherry III), I Come in Peace (Dark Angel) (US / Baxley), Heaven and Earth (Japan / Kadokawa), Mr. and Mrs. Bridge (UK / US / Ivory), *The Big Steal (Australia / Tass), Echoes of a Somber Empire (France / West Germany / Herzog), Zoo Piece (France / Marker), An Owl is an Owl is an Owl (France / Marker), Escape from the Liberty Cinema (Poland / Marczewski), Bad Influence (US / Hanson), Jetsons: the Movie (US / Barbera & Hanna), She Shoots Straight (Hong Kong / Corey Yuen), The Nights of Zayandeh-rood (Iran / Makhmalbaf), Frankenstein Unbound (US / Corman), Branches of the Tree (India / France / Ray), Monument (South Africa / Kentridge), The Hairdresser’s Husband (France / Leconte), Cloud-Paradise (Soviet Union / Dostal), Step Across the Border (Switzerland / Humbert & Penzel), *The Sound of the Shaking Earth (Portugal / Gomes), Encounter of the Spooky Kind 2 (Hong Kong / Ricky Lau), Welcome to Tokyo (?), Thazhavaram (India / Bharathan), The Sting of Death (Japan / Oguri), Prayer of the Rollerboys (Japan / US / King), 46/90 Falter 2 (Austria / Kren), Passage Through: A Ritual (US / Brakhage), Swordsman (Hong Kong / King Hu)

INDIVIDUAL BALLOTS
*(If you aren’t in here, I am so sorry. I did my best to be meticiulous and catch everybody, but I wouldn’t be surprised if I somehow missed a couple)

*I usually write out the publications or sites that people who freelance or write for a living are associated with, but I was unable to this time. I put your name in addition to your handle when I could. I hope that suffices!

Willow Maclay (@willow_catelyn)
1. Paris is Burning 2. Gremlins 2: The New Batch 3. Wild at Heart 4. Privilege 5. An Angel at My Table 6. Blue Steel 7. Goodfellas 8. No Fear, No Die 9. Total Recall 10. To Sleep with Anger

@brendanowicz
Trust, Goodfellas, King of New York, Close-Up, Gremlins 2: the New Batch, Jacob’s Ladder, Miami Blues, Metropolitan, The Ambulance, Lord of the Flies

Scout Tafoya (@Honors_Zombie)
Wild at Heart, Texasville, Close-up, Joe Versus the Volcano, To Sleep with Anger, King of New York, After Dark My Sweet, Maniac Cop 2, Tilai, I’m Dangerous Tonight

@tj_mackey432
1. Predator 2 2. Days of Thunder 3. Goodfellas 4. Total Recall 5. Miller’s Crossing 6. Joe Versus the Volcano 7. Problem Child 8. The Exorcist III 9. Hardware 10. Edward Scissorhands

@KenFrankenstein
1. Goodfellas 2. Miller’s Crossing 3. King of New York 4. Nightbreed 5. Jacob’s Ladder 6. Maniac Cop 2 7. Paris is Burning 8. Misery 9. Hardware 10. The Exorcist III

@therealaaronk
Goodfellas, Miller’s Crossing, Edward Scissorhands, King of New York, Total Recall, The Hunt for Red October, Darkman, Dances with Wolves, To Sleep with Anger, The Godfather III

@thegoatmajestic
Wild at Heart, Close-Up, Orpheus Descending, Night Cries: A Rural Tragedy, Goodfellas, To Sleep with Anger, Nightbreed, The Juniper Tree, Miller’s Crossing, Cry-Baby

Christianne Benedict (@doctor_morbius)
Bullet in the Head, A Chinese Ghost Story II, Days of Being Wild, Miller’s Crossing, After Dark My Sweet, Blue Steel, The Grifters, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, State of Grace, The Rescuers Down Under

@tosacinephile
1. Postcards from the Edge 2. Metropolitan 3. Close-Up 4. Goodfellas 5. The Grifters 6. Miller’s Crossing 7. Life is Sweet 8. Paris is Burning 9. To Sleep with Anger 10. Slacker

@IamNotTrevor
1. Gremlins 2: The New Batch 2. Wild at Heart 3. Goodfellas 4. Days of Being Wild 5. An Angel at My Table 6. Darkman 7. Total Recall 8. No Fear, No Die 9. Miller’s Crossing 10. The Exorcist III

@Aburnstine
1. Close-Up 2. To Sleep with Anger
All the Vermeers in New York, Total Recall, Miller’s Crossing, Days of Being Wild, Paris is Burning, Postcards from the Edge, The Golden Boat, The Match Factory Girl

@the_year_is_one
Goodfellas, Miller’s Crossing, Miami Blues, The Hot Spot, Misery, La Femme Nikita, Internal Affairs, Metropolitan, Slacker

@edgarVelRey1
1. Paris is Burning 2. Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down! 3. To Sleep with Anger 4. Days of Being Wild 5. No Fear, No Die 6. Wild at Heart 7. Mermaids 8. Miller’s Crossing 9. King of New York 10. Goodfellas

@ateliertovar (covet coven)
Archangel, An Angel at My Table, Close-Up, Days of Being Wild, Wild at Heart, The Juniper Tree, The Reflecting Skin, No Fear, No Die, Song of the Exile, Privilege

@derek_g (Derek Godin)
1. Total Recall 2. Goodfellas 3. Miller’s Crossing 4. Close-Up 5. Miami Blues 6. Tremors 7. Darkman 8. Hardware 9. Archangel 10. The Mind’s Eye: A Computer Animation Odyssey

@owmypancreas
Miami Blues, Trust, Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer (does not count), Goodfellas, Life is Sweet, The Match Factory Girl, Boiling Point, King of New York, Wild at Heart, The Reflecting Skin

@crankfapra
1. Miller’s Crossing 2. Trust 3. An Angel at My Table 4. Total Recall 5. Days of Being Wild 6. Goodfellas 7. Wild at Heart 8. The Reflecting Skin 9. Gremlins 2: The New Batch 10. Boiling Point

Paul Anthony Johnson (@Cinedaze)
1. Goodfellas 2. Miller’s Crossing 3. Days of Being Wild 4. Metropolitan 5. The Sheltering Sky 6. Truly Madly Deeply 7. Edward Scissorhands 8. Miami Blues 9. Gremlins 2: The New Batch 10. The Reflecting Skin

Max O’Connell (@maxboconnell)
Goodfellas, Close-Up, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Miami Blues, Total Recall, Days of Being Wild, White Hunter Black Heart, Metropolitan, Miller’s Crossing, Trust

Ian W. Hill (@geminicollision)
1. Trust 2. Goodfellas 3. Close-Up 4. Gremlins 2: The New Batch 5. Slacker 6. Bullet in the Head 7. The Comfort of Strangers 8. Miller’s Crossing 9. Days of Being Wild 10. Alexandria, Again and Forever (does not count: 1989)

Darren Williams (@GurneySlade)
1. To Sleep with Anger 2. Goodfellas 3. Freeze Die Come to Life 4. Archangel 5. Singapore Sling 6. Days of Being Wild 7. The Reflecting Skin 8. A Moment of Romance 9. Bullet in the Head 10. Song of the Exile

Audrey Fox (@audonamission)
1. Europa Europa 2. Home Alone 3. Goodfellas 4. Misery 5. Arachnophobia 6. Total Recall 7. The Witches 8. Cry-Baby 9. Pump Up the Volume 10. Gremlins 2: The New Batch 

@opalfilms
1. Goodfellas 2. Close-Up 3. Miami Blues 4. The Match Factory Girl 5. Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams 6. To Sleep with Anger 7. Life is Sweet 8. Joe Versus the Volcano 9. The Nasty Girl 10. Tremors

@sarahnwondrland
Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, State of Grace, Home Alone, Miller’s Crossing, Metropolitan, Goodfellas, Mermaids, Longtime Companion, My Blue Heaven, La Femme Nikita

@dandudeus
1. Joe Versus the Volcano 2. Bullet in the Head 3. Wild at Heart 4. Goodfellas
Quick Change, La Femme Nikita, Misery, House of Cards, Edward Scissorhands, Exorcist III

@parietines
Close-Up, To Sleep with Anger, The Reflecting Skin, An Angel at My Table, No Fear, No Die, How to Live in the German Federal Republic, Home Stories, Swan Lake: The Zone

@c0mmunicants
Begotten, The Juniper Tree, Tilai, To Sleep with Anger, Introduction to the End of an Argument, A Tale of Springtime, Twilight, The Second Circle, Briar Rose or the Sleeping Beauty

Alex Kittle (@alexxkittle)
Trust (x1000 over), Pump Up the Volume, Cry-Baby, My Blue Heaven, Postcards from the Edge, An Angel at My Table, The Reflecting Skin, Edward Scissorhands, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dea

Jake Cole (@jakepcole)
1. Close-Up 2. Goodfellas 3. Days of Being Wild 4. Gremlins 2: The New Batch 5. An Angel at My Table 6. To Sleep with Anger 7. White Hunter, Black Heart 8. Nouvelle Vague 9. Total Recall 10. Wild at Heart 

Alex Bauer (@ambauer)
Avalon, Mister Johnson, Dances with Wolves, Vincent & Theo, Miller’s Crossing, Goodfellas, Cry-Baby, The Rescuers Down Under

@LondonYLWL
Miami Blues, Goodfellas, Days of Being Wild, King of New York, Europa Europa, Miller’s Crossing, La Femme Nikita, State of Grace, Total Recall, Mermaids

@FleekestGeekest
The Ambulance, Prom Night III, Blue Steel

@supe_r_man
1. Paris is Burning 2. Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams 3. Close-Up 4. Miller’s Crossing 5. Goodfellas 6. Total Recall 7. Edward Scissorhands 8. Quigley Down Under 9. The Guardian 10. Home Alone

@Macchiato_Punk
Paris is Burning, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Wild at Heart, Joe Versus the Volcano

@Harlegator68
1. The Grifters 2. Europa, Europa 3. An Angel at My Table 4. Miller’s Crossing 5. Mountains of the Moon 6. Men Don’t Leave 7. Goodfellas 8. The Nasty Girl 9. May Fools 10. Trust

@markwahlbird 36
1. Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams 2. Miller’s Crossing 3. Paris is Burning 4. Close-Up 5. Edward Scissorhands 6. Jacob’s Ladder 7. Goodfellas 8. Misery 9. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead 10. Ghost 

Anthony Perronto (@peronto907)
Home Alone, Dances with Wolves, Troll 2, To Sleep with Anger, Goodfellas, The Witches, Wild at Heart, Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Tremors

@shentenza
1. Miller’s Crossing 2. Wild at Heart 3. Close-Up 4. Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams, 5. Goodfellas 6. Bullet in the Head 7. Misery 8. Total Recall 9. Tremors

Pat Healy (actor/director, Cheap Thrills, Compliance, Take Me) (@Pat_Healy)
1. Goodfellas 2. Miller’s Crossing 3. Quick Change 4. Miami Blues 5. Wild at Heart 6. Total Recall 7. State of Grace 8. Joe Versus the Volcano 9. Jacob’s Ladder 10. Edward Scissorhands

@SeanDuschane
Arachnophobia, Green Card, The Ambulance, The Exorcist III, The Freshman, King of New York, My Blue Heaven, Wild at Heart, Darkman, Grim Prairie Tales

@Matt_Sibley
1. Close-Up 2. Goodfellas 3. Miller’s Crossing 4. Total Recall 5. Metropolitan 6. Darkman 7. Edward Scissorhands 8. Wild at Heart 

@Jordantx
Close-Up, Wild at Heart, Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams, Edward Scissorhands

@LazlosGhost
1. Metropolitan 2. Goodfellas 3. Miller’s Crossing 4. Trust 5. After Dark, My Sweet 6. Wild at Heart 7. Close-Up 8. Edward Scissorhands 9. Miami Blues 10. Gremlins 2: The New Batch

@EF3ToBeYouAndMe
An Angel at My Table, Boiling Point, Close-Up, Goodfellas, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Ju Dou, Life is Sweet, Reversal of Fortune, A Tale of Springtime, To Sleep with Anger

Nathan Escar Smith (@trillmoregirls)
1. Gremlins 2: The New Batch 2. Bullet in the Head 3. Blue Steel 4. Total Recall 5. Slacker 6. Miami Blues 7. Texasville 8. Nouvelle Vague 9. Love at Large 10. Spontaneous Combustion 

@GrimsChild
Trust, Singapore Sling, Introduction to the End of an Argument, Sink or Swim, No Or the Vain Glory of Command, Pont de Varsovia (Warsaw Bridge), Close-Up, Mediator, Boris Gudunov, Mama

Vincent Alexander (@NonsenseIsland)
1. Gremlins 2: The New Batch 2. Edward Scissorhands 3. Goodfellas 4. Cry-Baby 5. Total Recall

Jessica Ritchey (@Ruby_Stevens)
Goodfellas, Graffiti Bridge, The Hunt for Red October, Nightbreed, Total Recall, Where the Heart Is

@ShakenVomit
Goodfellas, Trust, Wild at Heart, Quick Change, Darkman, Miller’s Crossing, Gremlins 2: The New Batch,. Pump Up the Volume, Total Recall, Hardware

Charlie Nash (@ctnash91)
Close-Up, Goodfellas, Wild at Heart, King of New York, An Angel at My Table, Paris is Burning, Total Recall, Blue Steel, Edward Scissorhands

Sean Gilman (@TheEndofCinema)
1. Miller’s Crossing 2. Days of Being Wild 3. Slacker 4. Metropolitan 5. Bullet in the Head 6. Goodfellas 7. Joe Versus the Volcano 8. Gremlins 2: The New Batch 9. Archangel 10. An Angel at My Table 

Mike Thorn (@MikeThornWrites)
Close-Up, The Godfather Part III, Spontaneous Combustion, Goodfellas, White Hunter Black Heart, The Sheltering Sky, Desperate Hours, New York Portrait Part III, Central Park, Revenge

@FoolishGiant
Miami Blues, Wild at Heart, Metropolitan, Goodfellas, Life is Sweet, Trust, The Spirit of 76, Slacker, Darkman, Home Alone

@butcherjpn
Miller’s Crossing, Metropolitan, Days of Being Wild, Goodfellas, Miami Blues, Boiling Point, Close-Up, Total Recall, The Hot Spot, Life is Sweet

William Boyle (@wmboyle4)
Goodfellas, Wild at Heart, Miller’s Crossing, Quick Change, Pump Up the Volume, To Sleep with Anger, Trust, King of New York, Love at Large, Blue Steel

@quinn_tweets
1. Paris is Burning 2. The Exorcist III 3. To Sleep with Anger 4. Postcards from the Edge 5. Close-Up 6. Cry-Baby 7. La Femme Nikita 8. Life is Sweet 9. Graffiti Bridge 10. Cat in the Brain 

Sheila O’Malley (@sheilakathleen)
Goodfellas, Total Recall, Miller’s Crossing, Wild at Heart, Close-Up, Metropolitan, Pump Up the Volume, Cry-Baby, Truly Madly Deeply, To Sleep with Anger

Logan Kenny (@LoganKenny1)
1. King of New York 2. Trust 3. Days of Thunder 4. Wild at Heart 5. Mo’ Better Blues 6. White Hunter Black Heart 7. Close-Up 8. Goodfellas 9. Bullet in the Head 10. The Godfather Part III

@toro913
Goodfellas, Trust, Close-Up, Miller’s Crossing, Life is Sweet, Metropolitan, Wild at Heart, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!, Edward Scissorhands

@MonsieurMarlowe
1. Miller’s Crossing 2. Days of Being Wild 3. Trust 4. Close-Up 5. Goodfellas 6. The Reflecting Skin 7. Total Recall 8. King of New York 9. Wild at Heart 10. Paris Is Burning

John Henderson (@hendersonjohnm)
1. Joe Versus the Volcano 2. Miller’s Crossing 3. Tremors 4. Goodfellas 5. Revenge 6. Quick Change 7. The Hunt for Red October 8. Dances with Wolves 9. Wild at Heart 10. The Two Jakes

Forrest Cardamenis (@FCardamenis)
Goodfellas, Close-Up, Days of Being Wild, The Garden, Privilege, Sink or Swim, King of New York

Emmet Sweeney @r_emmet
Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Close-Up, Look Out, Officer!, Total Recall, Men Don’t Leave, All for the Winner, Goodfellas, Days of Being Wild, Bullet in the Head

@FilmLandEmpire
1. Wild at Heart 2. Gremlins 2: The New Batch 3. Too Beautiful for You (1989, does not count) 4. War of the Roses (1989, does not count) 5. The Fabulous Baker Boys (1989, does not count) 6. Parenthood (1989, does not count) 7. She-Devil (1989, does not count) 8. Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down! 9. Cry-Baby 10. Total Recall 

Matthew Turner (@FilmFan1971)
1. Goodfellas 2. When Harry Met Sally (does not count) 3. Drugstore Cowboy (does not count) 4. Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down! 5. Tremors 6. Wild at Heart 7. Last Exit to Brooklyn (does not count) 8. The Fabulous Baker Boys (does not count) 9. Manon des Sources (does not count) 10. Born on the Fourth of July (does not count)

@loosecanons_
Total Recall, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Close-Up, Darkman, Dick Tracy, Troll 2, Blue Steel, Miami Blues, An Angel at My Table, Texasville

@theHobbyStudios
Edward Scissorhands, The Godfather Part III, Goodfellas, Total Recall, Home Alone

Sydney Taylor (@WildPalmCity)
Life is Sweet, The Match Factory Girl, To Sleep with Anger, Bullet in the Head, The Juniper Tree, Texasville, Impulse, Exorcist III, Hardware, Total Recall

@meliorism
Paris is Burning, Close-Up, Trust, Goodfellas, Wild at Heart, Metropolitan

chai goth (@Abid_ism)
To Sleep with Anger, Trust, Edward Scissorhands, King of New York, Dick Tracy, Mo’ Better Blues, Paris is Burning, Exorcist III, An Angel at My Table, Days of Being Wild, Wild at Heart 

Reece Beckett (@beckett_reece)
1. The Comfort of Strangers 2. The Rookie 3. Goodfellas 4. Close-Up 5. Days of Thunder 6. Miami Blues 7. King of New York 8. Cezanne 9. Misery 10. Bonfire of the Vanities 

@WhitlockandPope
1. Goodfellas 2. Total Recall 3. Edward Scissorhands 4. Wild at Heart 5. Gremlins 2: The New Batch 6. Misery 7. Days of Being Wild 8. La Femme Nikita 9. The Grifters 10. Jacob’s Ladder

@Snapporaz
A Tale of Springtime

@cass_milne
Slacker, Miller’s Crossing, Wild at Heart, Goodfellas, Trust, Metropolitan, The Godfather Part III, Jacob’s Ladder, To Sleep with Anger, Total Recall

@tedcogs
Cry-Baby, Darkman, La Femme Nikita, Goodfellas, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, King of New York, Miller’s Crossing, Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!, To Sleep with Anger, Wild at Heart

@JimReding2
Goodfellas, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Miami Blues, Quick Change, Texasville

Sarah Jane (@FookThis)
Miller’s Crossing, Wild at Heart, Goodfellas, The Krays, Kiki’s Delivery Service (1989, does not count), The Grifters, Life is Sweet, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!, Metropolitan

@asentionaut
Exorcist III, King of New York, Paris is Burning, Goodfellas, Begotten, Wild at Heart, Boiling Point, Jacob’s Ladder, Hardware

@Cocophone
Goodfellas, The Grifters, Metropolitan, Slacker, All the Vermeers in New York, Mermaids

@larrylazzard
1. Close-Up 2. Ghost 3. Slacker 4. Metropolitan 5. Goodfellas 6. Avalon 7. Miller’s Crossing 8. Gremlins 2: The New Batch 9. The Mind’s Eye: A Computer Animation Odyssey 10. Green Card

@jessicacrets
Days of Being Wild, Vincent & Theo, Miller’s Crossing, Goodfellas, Darkman, Metropolitan, Quick Change, Total Recall, A Shock to the System, Blue Steel

Sam Van Haren (@SamShotFirst)
Miller’s Crossing, Goodfellas, Misery, Darkman, The Hunt for Red October

@zzahos
1. Close-Up 2. To Sleep with Anger 3. Goodfellas 4. Trust 5. Paris is Burning 6. Central Park 7. White Hunter, Black Heart 8. Total Recall 9. Miller’s Crossing 10. Love at Large

@crbrinkmann
1. The Godfather Part III 2. White Hunter, Black Heart 3. Alice 4. Days of Thunder 5. Desperate Hours

@washedcat
1. Days of Being Wild 2. Paris is Burning 3. Gremlins 2: The New Batch 4. Close-Up 5. Goodfellas 6. To Sleep with Anger 7. Total Recall 8. Trust 9. Metropolitan 10. White Hunter, Black Heart 

Chadd Harbold (@chaddwithtwoDs
Goodfellas, Close-Up, Slacker, To Sleep with Anger, Miami Blues, The Match Factory Girl, Blue Steel, Exorcist III, Texasville

@MattchstickMan
Miller’s Crossing, Paris is Burning

Jake Tropila (@JakeTropila)
Dick Tracy, Goodfellas, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, King of New York, Maniac Cop 2, Miami Blues, Miller’s Crossing, Total Recall, Trust, Wild at Heart

@armenioja
Goodfellas, Close-Up, Metropolitan, Life is Sweet, Miller’s Crossing, An Angel at My Table, To Sleep with Anger, Trust, Boiling Point, Joe Versus the Volcano

@Panghule
The Reflecting Skin, Goodfellas, King of New York, Mountains of the Moon, The Exorcist III, The Freshman, Metropolitan, Pump Up the Volume, The Grifters, The Two Jakes

Michael Roffman (@michaelroffman)
Goodfellas, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Misery, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, The Witches, Edward Scissorhands, Back to the Future Part III, My Blue Heaven, Days of Thunder, Ghost

Kyle Stevens (@cinementalist)
Postcards from the Edge, Paris is Burning, Miller’s Crossing

Kimber Myers (@kimbermyers)
Awakenings, Goodfellas, Wild at Heart, The Grifters, Miller’s Crossing, The Nasty Girl, Mo’ Better Blues

@womensrites
An Angel at My Table, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Paris is Burning, King of New York, The Juniper Tree, Privilege, The Disenchanted

Clint Worthington (@clintworthing)
Goodfellas, Close-Up, Metropolitan, Sweetie (1989, does not count), Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams, Misery, Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!, Life is Sweet, An Angel at My Table, Kiki’s Delivery Service (1989, does not count)

@nwkitchens
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Goodfellas, Die Hard 2: Die Harder, Darkman, Tremors, Hamlet, The Hunt for Red October, Total Recall, Presumed Innocent, Joe Versus the Volcano

@selmerguy
Truly Madly Deeply, Misery, Cyrano de Bergerac, The Grifters, Wild at Heart, Postcards from the Edge

@bartoloshalom
Days of Being Wild, The Garden, Metropolitan, Singapore Sling, Mo’ Better Blues, Close-Up

@danny_reviews
Goodfellas, An Angel at My Table, Miller’s Crossing, Wild at Heart, Henry and June, Home Alone, Misery, Reversal of Fortune, The Field, Life is Sweet

@TearsinRainbows
Edward Scissorhands, Miller’s Crossing

@MoshJurray
1. Miami Blues 2. Close-Up 3. Metropolitan 4. To Sleep with Anger 5. Goodfellas 6. Postcards from the Edge 7. Miller’s Crossing 8. Total Recall 9. The Hunt for Red October 10. Wild at Heart 

Brian Darr (@HellonFriscoBay)
46/90 Falter 2, American Dream, The Garden, Miami Blues, New York Portrait III, Paris is Burning, Passage Through: A Ritual, Santcus, Swordsman, To Sleep with Anger

@ohrachelleigh
An Angel at My Table, Henry and June, Miller’s Crossing, Misery, Reversal of Fortune, Goodfellas, Days of Being Wild, The Field, Alice, Wild at Heart 

@BenStarkFilm
Miller’s Crossing, Goodfellas, Blue Steel, Dances with Wolves, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, The Hunt for Red October, Darkman, Misery, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Wild at Heart 

Noah Gittell (@noahgittell)
Joe Versus the Volcano, Goodfellas, Close-Up, Quick Change, Mo’ Better Blues, Wild at Heart, Postcards from the Edge, Miller’s Crossing, Misery, The Godfather Part III

@ipod_video
1. Close-Up 2. King of New York 3. Slacker 4. Goodfellas 5. Gremlins 2: The New Batch 6. Days of Thunder 7. Total Recall 8. Miller’s Crossing 9. No Fear, No Die 10. Problem Child

Joseph Elliott @fromthereel)
Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams, Life is Sweet, Miller’s Crossing

Kip Mooney (@kipjmooney)
1. Goodfellas 2. Miller’s Crossing 3. Misery 4. Edward Scissorhands 5. Wild at Heart 6. The Hunt for Red October 7. Postcards from the Edge 8. The Grifters 9. Arachnophobia 10. Tremors

@jackr3ad
1. Close-Up 2. To Sleep with Anger 3. Joe Versus the Volcano 4. Metropolitan 5. Postcards from the Edge 6. Sweetie (does not count) 7. Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down! 8. Dick Tracy 9. Days of Being Wild 10. Gremlins 2: The New Batch

@thamosdeaf
1. Goodfellas 2. Cry-Baby 3. To Sleep with Anger 4. Begotten 5. King of New York 6. Total Recall 7. Metropolitan 8. Dick Tracy 9. Miller’s Crossing 10. Wild at Heart 

@mail_yard
Miller’s Crossing, Boiling Point, To Sleep with Anger, Quick Change, Darkman, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams, Miami Blues, Joe Versus the Volcano, Wild at Heart

Maxwell Q. Wolkin (@maxwell_qw)
Blue Steel, Cry-Baby, Days of Being Wild, Goodfellas, Metropolitan, Paris is Burning, Total Recall, Wild at Heart, The Witches

@ryansloggedon
The Exorcist III, Goodfellas, Metropolitan, King of New York, Total Recall, Home Alone

@decoyrobot
1. Goodfellas 2. Close-Up 3. Wild at Heart 4. Blue Steel 5. Miller’s Crossing 6. White Hunter, Black Heart 7. Jacob’s Ladder

@Jamalski96
1. Goodfellas 2. Total Recall 3. Wild at Heart 4. Robocop 2 5. Europa, Europa 6. Close-Up 7. Miller’s Crossing 8. Misery 9. Home Alone 10. Kindergarten Cop

@Stigkk
Men Don’t Leave, Goodfellas, Miller’s Crossing, Dances with Wolves, The Russia House, The Grifters, Mermaids, State of Grace, The Godfather Part III

Bri!! (@48ONIRAM)
An Angel at My Table, Goodfellas, Mo’ Better Blues, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams, The Comfort of Strangers, Ju Dou, Hardware, Days of Being Wild, To Sleep with Anger

Sara M. Fetters (@MovieFreakSara)
1. The Grifters 2. Gremlins 2: The New Batch 3. La Femme Nikita 4. Goodfellas 5. Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down! 6. Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer (does not count) 7. Miller’s Crossing 8. Postcards from the Edge 9. The Hunt for Red October 10. White Hunter, Black Heart 

@hymenoptera79
Goodfellas, The Grifters, Internal Affairs, Total Recall, Tremors, After Dark My Sweet, La Femme Nikita, Edward Scissorhands, Henry and June, Metropolitan

@severalmoons
Edward Scissorhands, Pretty Woman, Home Alone, Troll 2, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Cry-Baby

@KinetoscopeFilm
Close-Up, Edward Scissorhands, Goodfellas, King of New York, The Match Factory Girl, Miller’s Crossing, Quick Change, Reversal of Fortune, Total Recall, Wild at Heart

Niles Schwartz
Goodfellas, Close-Up, The Godfather Part III, Miller’s Crossing, The Grifters, Vincent & Theo, Q&A, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Metropolitan, To Sleep with Anger

David Sims (@davidlsims)
1. Goodfellas 2. Close-Up 3. To Sleep with Anger 4. King of New York 5. Sweetie (does not count) 6. Metropolitan 7. Dick Tracy 8. Wild at Heart 9. Blue Steel 10. Mo’ Better Blues

@aprylhm
Goodfellas, Flatliners, Wild at Heart, Misery, Home Alone, Miller’s Crossing, The Witches

Michael Smith (@whitecitycinema)
1. Nouvelle Vague 2. Close-Up 3. To Sleep with Anger 4. Goodfellas 5. Gremlins 2: The New Batch 6. Days of Being Wild 7. King of New York 8. An Angel at My Table 9. Wild at Heart 10. Total Recall

Joel Mayward (@JoelMayward)
Goodfellas, Close-Up, Wild at Heart, Metropolitan, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, The Hunt for Red October, The Match Factory Girl, Miller’s Crossing, Total Recall, Troll 2

Stephan Phelan (@hyperphelan)
Miller’s Crossing, King of New York, Days of Being Wild, Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams

@elefante111
Wild at Heart, Joe Versus the Volcano, Love at Large, Gremlins 2: The New Batch

@majormckeithen
Goodfellas, Misery, Total Recall, Close-Up, Tremors, The Exorcist III, The Juniper Tree, Miller’s Crossing, Wild at Heart, Home Alone

@EddieSelover
Vincent & Theo, Texasville, The Freshman, Joe Versus the Volcano, Everybody Wins

@meowsaystheemo
Home Alone, Pretty Woman, Paris is Burning, Ghost

@marshlands
To Sleep with Anger, King of New York, Central Park, Boiling Point, Miami Blues, After Dark My Sweet, Trust, The Match Factory Girl, Close-Up, The Sheltering Sky

@alexcmurphy
Close-Up, Goodfellas, Metropolitan, Ju Dou, Paris is Burning, Slacker, La Femme Nikita, Misery, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Miller’s Crossing

@EastmanFade
Goodfellas, Miller’s Crossing, Misery, King of New York, Darkman, Total Recall, Frankenhooker, The Exorcist III, Tremors, Tales from the Darkside

@troubleeveryday
Singapore Sling, Trust, Sink or Swim, Close-Up, Song of the Exile, Nouvelle Vague, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, To Sleep with Anger, A Tale of Springtime, I Hired a Contract Killer

@TheMike31
1. Blue Steel 2. Goodfellas 3. Total Recall 4. The Ambulance 5. Joe Versus the Volcano 6. Punk Vacation 7. Die Hard 2: Die Harder 8. Taking Care of Business 9. After Dark, My Sweet 10. Spaced Invaders

@androsrenatus
Goodfellas, Total Recall, Edward Scissorhands, Wild at Heart, Jacob’s Ladder, The Godfather Part III, Misery, Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams, Home Alone, Back to the Future Part III

Peter Labuza (@labuzamovies)
Mama, Sink or Swim, Sanctus, Made in Hollywood, How to Live in the German Federal Republic, Close-Up, King of New York, Quick Change, Metropolitan, Tongues United (1989, does not count)

@JuliusBarthelme
Miller’s Crossing, Miami Blues, Jacob’s Ladder, Metropolitan, Robocop 2, After Dark My Sweet, Cry-Baby, Wild at Heart, Pump Up the Volume, Henry and June

Danny Bowes (@bybowes)
1. Miller’s Crossing 2. Goodfellas 3. Close-Up 4. Total Recall 5. King of New York 6. The Hunt for Red October 7. Ju Dou 8. Postcards from the Edge 9. Bullet in the Head 10. Pretty Woman

@davo_arid
The Nasty Girl, Life is Sweet, Goodfellas, Metropolitan, Sink or Swim

@shaerint
Goodfellas, Joe Versus the Volcano, Miller’s Crossing, Dick Tracy

@MrTheoRandle
Wild at Heart, Miller’s Crossing, The Exorcist III, Joe Versus the Volcano, Goodfellas, Tremors, Frankenhooker, Hardware, King of New York, Total Recall

@TheMorgster
Frankenhooker, Trust, Blue Steel, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Rockula, Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!, Mirror Mirror, Demon Wind, Joe Versus the Volcano, Pledge Night

@StrenuousOrb
1. Goodfellas 2. Close-Up 3. Paris is Burning 4. Total Recall 5. Wild at Heart 6. Jacob’s Ladder 7. Days of Being Wild 8. After Dark, My Sweet 9. Mo’ Better Blues 10. The Exorcist III

@heyyoallison
Goodfellas, Avalon, Cry-Baby, Dick Tracy, The Grifters, Home Alone, Wild at Heart, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Metropolitan, To Sleep with Anger

@mciocco
Miller’s Crossing, Goodfellas, The Hunt for Red October, Total Recall, The Exorcist III, Quick Change, Tremors, Ju Dou, Bullet in the Head

@videodrome71
King of New York

Sharon Knolle (@sknolle)
Goodfellas, Paris is Burning, Miller’s Crossing, The Grifters, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, After Dark My Sweet, State of Grace, The Witches, Reversal of Fortune, Awakenings

@zdbarnes
Miller’s Crossing, Close-Up, Paris is Burning, Truly Madly Deeply, Total Recall, Metropolitan, White Hunter Black Heart 

@MarsRich
Gremlins 2: The New Batch

Jimi Fletcher (@mrjimifletcher)
1. Total Recall 2. Nightbreed 3. Gremlins 2: The New Batch 4. Arachnophobia 5. Goodfellas 6. House Party 7. King of New York 8. Edward Scissorhands 9. Wild at Heart 10. Darkman 

@AndySmart1
Misery, Goodfellas, Jacob’s Ladder, Miller’s Crossing, La Femme Nikita, Paris is Burning, Total Recall, King of New York, Days of Thunder, Tremors

@rgodfrey
Edward Scissorhands, La Femme Nikita, The Grifters, Joe Versus the Volcano, Metropolitan, Miller’s Crossing, Quick Change, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, Postcards from the Edge, Slacker

@Strangetramp
1. Days of Being Wild 2. Trust 3. Miller’s Crossing 4. Goodfellas 5. Ju Dou 6. Edward Scissorhands 7. To Sleep with Anger 8. Close-Up 9. The Match Factory Girl 10. Gremlins 2: The New Batch

@codyworkingman
Goodfellas, Days of Being Wild, Blue Steel, Wild at Heart, White Hunter Black Heart, Miller’s Crossing, The Grifters, Mo’ Better Blues, Total Recall, King of New York 

@Heffomite
Goodfellas, The Hunt for Red October, Joe Versus the Volcano, Quick Change, Metropolitan, Miller’s Crossing, My Blue Heaven, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, House Party, Total Recall 

Toby Ximenez (@tobiasziminez)
1. Goodfellas 2. Close-Up 3. Gremlins 2: The New Batch 4. Edward Scissorhands 5. Jacob’s Ladder 6. Landscape in the Mist 7. Miller’s Crossing 8. To Sleep with Anger 9. Wild at Heart 10. Tremors

Mitch Lovell (@TheVideoVacuum)
1. Rocky V 2. Total Recall 3. Robocop 2 4. Frankenhooker 5. Days of Thunder 6. Goodfellas 7. Gremlins 2: The New Batch 8. Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer (does not count) 9. Troll 2 10. Die Hard 2: Die Harder

@Arun Welandawe-Prematilleke (@ArunIndika)
1. Close-Up 2. Goodfellas 3. Postcards from the Edge 4. The Grifters 5. Sweetie (does not count) 6. Wild at Heart 7. Metropolitan 8. To Sleep with Anger 9. Cyrano de Bergerac 10. Reversal of Fortune 

@MannyHec
Jacob’s Ladder (#1), Arachnophobia, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Slacker, The Exorcist III, Goodfellas, Tremors, Nightbreed, Misery, Darkman 

@twitersean
Goodfellas, The Two Jakes, The Grifters, Joe Versus the Volcano, Miller’s Crossing, Presumed Innocent, Days of Being Wild, Pump Up the Volume, White Hunter Black Heart, Miami Blues

@benfrench101
Metropolitan 

@priesto77
Predator 2, Lionheart, Death Warrant, Total Recall, Kindergarten Cop, Die Hard 2: Die Harder, Goodfellas, Misery, The Hunt for Red October, Another 48 Hrs. 

@Coolclearwaters
Miller’s Crossing, The Grifters, Goodfellas, Avalon, After Dark My Sweet, The Witches, To Sleep with Anger, Vincent & Theo, Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams, Tremors

@Cinematic_Life
Goodfellas, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Edward Scissorhands, Metropolitan, The Exorcist III, Wild at Heart, Misery

@purehero
Miller’s Crossing, The Freshman, Postcards from the Edge

Tom Nissley @TomNissley
An Angel at My Table, Close-Up, Strangers in Good Company, Goodfellas, Life is Sweet, Edward Scissorhands, Metropolitan, The Grifters, Pump Up the Volume, Quick Change

@Cinema60podcast
1. Miller’s Crossing 2. Trust 3. Life is Sweet 4. The Grifters 5. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead 6. Without You I’m Nothing 7. Metropolitan 8. Strangers in Good Company 9. Close-Up 10. Mindwalk 

James Wilkonson (@JBernardJunior)
1. Jacob’s Ladder 2. Pump Up the Volume 3. Goodfellas 4. Presumed Innocent 5. Quick Change 6. The Narrow Margin 7. Miller’s Crossing 8. The Godfather Part III 9. Troll 2 10. Awakenings

@NOKIDSGOTCATS
Darkman, Boiling Point, Miller’s Crossing, Goodfellas, Frankenhooker, King of New York, Jacob’s Ladder, Misery, Total Recall, Mo’ Better Blues

@BigWillCarp
Goodfellas, Wild at Heart, Total Recall, Jacob’s Ladder, State of Grace, The Witches, Nightbreed

@charliecanz
1. Goodfellas 2. The Hunt for Red October 3. American Dream 4. Arachnophobia 5. Close-Up 6. Dances with Wolves 7. Total Recall 8. Bullet in the Head 9. Pump Up the Volume 10. Misery

@AWHofbauer
1. Days of Being Wild 2. Gremlins 2: The New Batch 3. Joe Versus the Volcano 4. Close-Up 5. Goodfellas 6. Wild at Heart 7. Ju Dou 8. Pump Up the Volume 9. Edward Scissorhands 10. DuckTales the Movie: Treasure of the Lost Lamp 

@samloomis13
Reversal of Fortune, The Grifters, The Hunt for Red October, Misery, Presumed Innocent, Edward Scissorhands, Die Hard 2: Die Harder, Total Recall, Tremors, Jacob’s Ladder

@THAWK_79
1. Misery 2. Goodfellas 3. Arachnophobia 4. Pump Up the Volume 5. Edward Scissorhands 6. Gremlins 2: The New Batch 7. Back to the Future Part III 8. Flatliners 9. Psycho IV: The Beginning 10. Jacob’s Ladder

@2813f8bb97c8434
Mr. Destiny, Pump Up the Volume, Flatliners, Total Recall, Dances with Wolves, Goodfellas, The Hunt for Red October

@lukas_fryter
1. Close-Up 2. Goodfellas 3. Total Recall 4. To Sleep with Anger 5. Wild at Heart 6. Edward Scissorhands 7. Kiki’s Delivery Service (1989, does not count) 8. Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams 9. Metropolitan 10. Days of Being Wild

@sdcinerama
Miller’s Crossing, Goodfellas, Awakenings, Dances with Wolves, State of Grace, Misery, Pump Up the Volume, The Grifters, Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams, The Hunt for Red October

James L. Neibaur
Alice, Avalon, The Nasty Girl, Europa Europa, The Freshman, Hard to Kill, Goodfellas, Longtime Companion, Misery, White Hunter Black Heart 

@Michae7E
1. Trust 2. Close-Up 3. Slacker 4. Days of Being Wild 5. Goodfellas 6. White Hunter Black Heart 7. Bullet in the Head 8. King of New York 9. No Fear, No Die 10. Wild at Heart 

Justin Stillmaker (@JustStillmaker)
Goodfellas, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Home Alone, Total Recall, Blue Steel, Wild at Heart, Darkman, La Femme Nikita, Joe Versus the Volcano, Miller’s Crossing

@JackKea63584677
Goodfellas, Close-Up, Mo’ Better Blues, Wild at Heart, Total Recall, Miller’s Crossing, Edward Scissorhands, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, The Godfather Part III, Joe Versus the Volcano

@jakelong64 183
Goodfellas, Miller’s Crossing, Wild at Heart, Paris is Burning, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Total Recall, Metropolitan, Life is Sweet, To Sleep with Anger, King of New York, Trust, Jacob’s Ladder

@BrettHickman15
Goodfellas, Dances with Wolves, Revenge, Joe Versus the Volcano, Dick Tracy, Pump Up the Volume, State of Grace, King of New York, Miller’s Crossing, The Godfather Part III

@Jagodesu
The Hunt for Red October, Gremlins 2: The New Batch

Fiona Underhill (@FionaUnderhill)
Joe Versus the Volcano, Total Recall, The Witches, Tremors, Goodfellas, Ghost, Pretty Woman, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, Life is Sweet, Truly Madly Deeply

@KirsCoachman
Mermaids, Home Alone, Dick Tracy, Edward Scissorhands, Ghost, Postcards from the Edge, The Witches, Gremlins 2: The New Batch

Mom:
Home Alone, Edward Scissorhands, Ghost, Goodfellas, Mermaids

Eric Mattina (@thefilmviews)
1. Goodfellas 2. Begotten 3. Miami Blues 4. Total Recall 5. The Cook, the Thief, His Wife and Her Lover (does not count) 6. Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down! 7.  The Killer (does not count) 8. Misery 9. Avalon 10. Maniac Cop 2

@Andrew_Bemis
Goodfellas, Miller’s Crossing, Total Recall, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Wild at Heart, Paris is Burning, The Witches, Cry-Baby, Edward Scissorhands, Joe Versus the Volcano

@twarner59
Paris is Burning, King of New York, The Hunt for Red October, Blue Steel, Tremors, La Femme Nikita

@TheHotelEarle
1. Presumed Innocent 2. Joe Versus the Volcano 3. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead 4. Pump Up the Volume 5. Miller’s Crossing

Harry Eskin (@harryeskin)
1. Gremlins 2: The New Batch 2. The Witches 3. Wild at Heart 4. Dick Tracy 5. Everybody Wins 6. Edward Scissorhands 7. The Freshman 8. Grim Prairie Tales

@njmahan
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles

Robert Ham (@roberthamwriter)
1. Close-Up 2. Days of Being Wild 3. Goodfellas 4. Miami Blues 5. Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer (does not count) 6. Life is Sweet 7. Wild at Heart 8. Tilai 9. Larks on a String 10. The Hunt for Red October

Henri de Corinth (@henridecorinth)
The Asthenic Syndrome, Corpus perdus, Artificial Paradise, Nostos: The Return, The Vampire Family, In Memory of the Day Passed By, Swan Lake: The Zone, Children of Hotel America, Treasure of the Bitch Islands, Venus

@Rouidaaa
1. Goodfellas 2. Home Alone 3. The Godfather Part III 4. Awakenings 5. Pretty Woman 6. Back to the Future Part III

@ProculSpectator
Mountains of the Moon, Goodfellas, Arachnophobia, The Witches, Dances with Wolves, Bonfire of the Vanities, Awakenings, Wild at Heart, Joe Versus the Volcano 

Ryan Perez (@Ryguyperez)
1. Goodfellas 2. Life is Sweet 3. Quick Change 4. Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams 5. Edward Scissorhands 6. Total Recall 7. Misery 8. Close-Up 9. Awakenings 10. Joe Versus the Volcano 

@KRubble44
1. Goodfellas 2. Misery 3. Presumed Innocent 4. The Hunt for Red October 5. Dances with Wolves 6. Blind Fury 7. House Party 8. My Blue Heaven 9. Darkman 10. Back to the Future Part III

@TheRoBeast
Jacob’s Ladder, The Grifters, Cry-Baby, Lord of the Flies, Misery, Edward Scissorhands, Leatherface: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre III, It, The Exorcist III, Frankenhooker

@jrwells82
1. Goodfellas 2. Home Alone 3. Kindergarten Cop 4. Back to the Future Part III 5. Gremlins 22: The New Batch 6. Misery 7. Quigley Down Under 8. Problem Child 9. Awakenings 10. Hard to Kill

❤ Greg Mucci ❤ (@reelbrew)
Hardware, Miller’s Crossing, Home Alone, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Jacob’s Ladder, King of New York, Goodfellas, Mermaids, In the Cold of the Night, The Ambulance

Josh Slater-Williams (@jslaterwilliams)
1. Trust 2. Goodfellas 3. King of New York 4. Gremlins 2: The New Batch 5. Total Recall 6. Miller’s Crossing 7. Paris is Burning 8. Close-Up 9. Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down! 10. Days of Being Wild 

Nat Brehmer (@NatBrehmer)
Nightbreed, Tales from the Darkside, Back to the Future Part III, Frankenhooker, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, The Exorcist III, Night of the Living Dead, Home Alone, Predator 2, Misery 

@the_iron_fleet
Tremors

Sally Jane Black (@fuschiadyke)
Sink or Swim, Strangers in Good Company, Mermaids, Unspeakable Acts, Song of the Exile, Sanctus, Life is Sweet, Paris is Burning, The Death King, Horse and Woman and Dog

@beefsworld
Life is Sweet, Miller’s Crossing, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Trust, To Sleep with Anger, Wild at Heart, Singapore Sling, Goodfellas, Troll 2

@JohnEmelianoff
Goodfellas, The Adventures of Ford Fairlaine, Total Recall, Michael Jordan’s Playground, Bullet in the Head, Frankenhooker, Quick Change, Presumed Innocent, Tiger Cage II, Predator 2

@neardowell
Awakenings, Goodfellas, The Russia House, Pump Up the Volume, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Home Alone, Dick Tracy, Arachnophobia, Ernest Goes to Jail

@JoeTheNightOwl
1. Jacob’s Ladder 2. Die Hard 2: Die Harder 3. Total Recall 4. Predator 2 5. Robocop 2 6. Tremors 7. Arachnophobia 8. Home Alone 9. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 10. I Come in Peace (Dark Angel)

@kalatozov
Sink or Swim, Days of Being Wild, Close-Up, Begotten, Strangers in Good Company, Song of the Exile, An Angel at My Table, To Sleep with Anger, Ju Dou, Sanctus

@blackdieseluk
Edward Scissorhands, Goodfellas, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, King of New York, Pump Up the Volume, Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!, To Sleep with Anger, Total Recall, Tremors, Wild at Heart

@krankor1
Vincent & Theo, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Miami Blues, The Witches, Truly Madly Deeply, The Grifters, Paris is Burning

@reeljorlcopling
Monsieur Hire (1989, does not count), Goodfellas, Close-Up, Miller’s Crossing, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Edward Scissorhands, Awakenings, The Grifters, Total Recall, Die Hard 2: Die Harder

@silverageindie
The Hunt for Red October, Metropolitan, Reversal of Fortune, Goodfellas, Days of Being Wild, Paris is Burning, The Nasty Girl, I Hired a Contract Killer, Internal Affairs, Life is Sweet

Zach Vasquez
Miller’s Crossing, Goodfellas, King of New York, Maniac Cop 2, Slacker, Miami Blues, The Grifters, Wild at Heart, Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams, After Dark My Sweet

@magadizer
Close-Up, Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams, Metropolitan, Goodfellas, Miller’s Crossing, Home Alone, The Godfather Part III

@JFrankensteiner
1. Goodfellas 2. Days of Being Wild 3. King of New York 4. Miami Blues 5. Trust 6. To Sleep with Anger 7. Miller’s Crossing 8. Total Recall 9. Bullet in the Head 10. The Match Factory Girl 

@jkamensky
Tremors, Metropolitan, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, American Dream, Wild at Heart, The Grifters, Darkman, Miller’s Crossing, Goodfellas, The Nasty Girl

@SchmuckForALife
Close-Up, The Exorcist III, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, The Rescuers Down Under, Slacker, To Sleep with Anger, Total Recall, Tremors

@SilentDawnLB
1. Close-Up 2. Goodfellas 3. Total Recall 4. Dick Tracy 5. Gremlins 2: The New Batch 6. Bullet in the Head 7. Paris is Burning 8. Wild at Heart 9. Child’s Play 2 10. Cry-Baby

Justine Smith (@redroomrantings)
1. To Sleep with Anger 2. No, or the Vain Glory of Command 3. Wild at Heart 4. Goodfellas 5. Metropolitan 6. An Angel at My Table 7. Paris is Burning 8. Postcards from the Edge 9. Gremlins 2: The New Batch 10. Joe Versus the Volcano

@BabsVan
Goodfellas, Miller’s Crossing, Home Alone, Total Recall, Jacob’s Ladder, Tremors, Darkman, Misery, Edward Scissorhands, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles

@manyj_p
1. Close-Up 2. Goodfellas 3. King of New York 4. To Sleep with Anger 5. Days of Being Wild 6. White Hunter, Black Heart 7. Miller’s Crossing 8. Bullet to the Head 9. Total Recall 10. Wild at Heart

@Ouisconinite
Edward Scissorhands, Pump Up the Volume, Joe Versus the Volcano, Misery, Back to the Future Part III, Die Hard 2: Die Harder, The Exorcist III, Total Recall, Blind Fury, Dick Tracy 

Jayson Buford (@jaysonbuford)
Goodfellas, Miller’s Crossing, Wild at Heart, King of New York, Misery, Days of Thunder, Pretty Woman, Dick Tracy, The Godfather Part II, Mo’ Better Blues

@Evgenlzmail
1. Goodfellas 2. Total Recall 3. Gremlins 2: The New Batch 4. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead 5. Mo’ Better Blues 6. Ju Dou 7. Trust 8. Dick Tracy 9. Darkman 10. Jacob’s Ladder

@MisterOohlala
Goodfellas, Total Recall, Edward Scissorhands, Misery, Wild at Heart, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Cry-Baby, Kindergarten Cop, Child’s Play 2, Dick Tracy 

@encyclophobia
Paris is Burning, Wild at Heart, Miller’s Crossing, La Femme Nikita, Misery, Edward Scissorhands, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Cry-Baby, Tremors

@AustinShermer
1. Goodfellas 2. Bullet in the Head 3. Close-Up 4. Miller’s Crossing 5. Paris is Burning 6. Total Recall 7. Metropolitan 8. Miami Blues 9. White Hunter Black Heart 10. Gremlins 2: The New Batch 

@DarrellBratz
Joe Versus the Volcano, Miller’s Crossing, Goodfellas, Mo’ Better Blues, Metropolitan, Dances with Wolves, Cry-Baby, Wild at Heart, Dick Tracy 

@bunnifluzl
Close-Up, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, Goodfellas, Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams, Metropolitan, An Angel at My Table, Edward Scissorhands, Cyrano de Bergerac, Days of Being Wild, Trust

@johnbennett812
1. Wild at Heart 2. Central Park 3. Europa Europa 4. To Sleep with Anger 5. Goodfellas 6. The Match Factory Girl 7. A Tale of Springtime 8. Sink or Swim 9. King of New York 10. Close-Up

Ryan Swen (@swen_ryan)
Trust, Close-Up, Days of Being Wild, Bullet in the Head

@danpullenbooks
Goodfellas, Edward Scissorhands, Total Recall, Singapore Sling, Heaven and Earth, King of New York, Europa Europa, My Blue Heaven, Misery

Andrew Carden (@AwardsConnect)
Alice, Bonfire of the Vanities, Child’s Play 2, Edward Scissorhands, The Exorcist III, Goodfellas, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Longtime Companion, Misery, Mr. and Mrs. Bridge

Michael Snydel (@snydel)
Goodfellas, Miller’s Crossing, Close-Up, Miami Blues, Total Recall, King of New York, Metropolitan, Born on the Fourth of July (1989, does not count), Misery, Gremlins 2: The New Batch 

@ledzeppjack
Goodfellas, Miller’s Crossing, Wild at Heart, Bullet in the Head, Days of Being Wild, The Hunt for Red October, Metropolitan, An Angel at My Table, La Femme Nikita, Blue Steel 

@darrenmjones
Trust, Tremors, The Grifters, Europa Europa, The Big Steal, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, The Match Factory Girl, Miami Blues, Joe Versus the Volcano

@veidtlemania
Close-Up, Paris is Burning, Wild at Heart, To Sleep with Anger, The Exorcist III, Goodfellas, Child’s Play 2

@petertritter
Yum, Yum, Yum! A Taste of Cajun and Creole Cooking in Louisiana, Mindwalk, King of New York, Life is Sweet, Wild at Heart, Echoes of a Somber Empire, Metropolitan, Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams, Goodfellas, Total Recall 

@aleph_nought
Sink or Swim, Close-Up, Paris is Burning, Tremors, Spontaneous Combustion, Zoo Piece, An Owl is An Owl is An Owl

@AbsurdlyJames
Joe Versus the Volcano, The Freshman, The Hunt for Red October, Total Recall, Misery

@PlurabelleG
Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!, Wild at Heart, Archangel, Miller’s Crossing, Close-Up, An Angel at My Table, Goodfellas, Days of Being Wild, The Match Factory Girl, Cry-Baby

Jared Gores (@GoresEatsFilm)
Goodfellas, Metropolitan, Days of Being Wild, Paris is Burning, Miller’s Crossing, Close-Up, To Sleep with Anger, Trust, The Match Factory Girl

@mistermoofoo
My Blue Heaven, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, Awakenings, Darkman, Tremors, I Love You to Death, Miller’s Crossing, Jacob’s Ladder, The Rescuers Down Under, Misery

@Nick_Desmond
Close-Up, Escape from the Liberty Cinema, Central Park, Total Recall, Dick Tracy, Days of Being Wild, Goodfellas, Vincent & Theo 

@lrjcsmmt
1. Close-Up 2. White Hunter, Black Heart 3. To Sleep with Anger 4. Paris is Burning 5. Archangel 6. Goodfellas 7. Total Recall 8. Pump Up the Volume 9. Joe Versus the Volcano 10. Miami Blues

@Brennie_Cee
Goodfellas, Metropolitan, A Tale of Springtime, Miller’s Crossing, To Sleep with Anger, May Fools, Life is Sweet

@bbbyvgl
Alice, Cry-Baby, Metropolitan, A Tale of Springtime, Total Recall

Tom Nixon (@tnixonTMS)
1. Miller’s Crossing 2. Trust 3. Gremlins 2: The New Batch 4. Wild at Heart 5. Metropolitan 6. Days of Being Wild 7. Singapore Sling 8. Total Recall 9. Close-Up 10. King of New York 

@thepwrofluv
Dick Tracy, Goodfellas, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Joe Versus the Volcano, King of New York, The Match Factory Girl, Metropolitan, Miller’s Crossing, Paris is Burning, Total Recall 

@HenseckerProxy
Wild at Heart, The Witches, Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!, To Sleep with Anger, Def by Temptation, Jacob’s Ladder, The Reflecting Skin, Dick Tracy, The Comfort of Strangers, Paris is Burning

Jim Keist (@jimik64)
Life is Sweet, Miller’s Crossing, Wild at Heart, Total Recall, Goodfellas, King of New York, The Freshman, Miami Blues

@ElisaSDavis
Presumed Innocent, Internal Affairs, Bad Influence, Miami Blues, The Freshman, Metropolitan, Goodfellas, Avalon, Miller’s Crossing, Longtime Companion

Ben! (@Hooraydiation)
Misery, Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams, Frankenhooker, Wild at Heart, Joe Versus the Volcano, Close-Up, Maniac Cop 2, The Juniper Tree, Jacob’s Ladder, Streets

@paolocase
Goodfellas, Paris is Burning, Miller’s Crossing, Edward Scissorhands, Wild at Heart, Close-Up, Dances with Wolves, Avalon, The Grifters

Juan Carlos Jiménez (@jotace85)
Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Total Recall, Darkman, Back to the Future Part III, The Godfather Part III, The Hunt for Red October, Jetsons: The Movie, Ducktales the Movie: Treasure of the Lost Lamp, Cyrano de Bergerac, Home Alone

Nathaniel Rogers (@nathanielr)
The Grifters, Postcards from the Edge, Edward Scissorhands, Metropolitan, Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!, Men Don’t Leave, Longtime Companion, Henry and June

@anteyhon
An Angel at My Table, Childhood Days, Close-Up, Days of Being Wild, Goodfellas, The Match Factory Girl, Metropolitan, Paris is Burning, She Shoot Straight, Song of the Exile

Michael Nazarewycz (@HeyMichaelNaz)
Dick Tracy, Darkman, The Grifters, Days of Thunder, Ghost, Pump Up the Volume, Kiki’s Delivery Service (1989, does not count)

@lschibi
Maniac Cop 2, Tales from the Darkside: The Movie, Tremors, Jacob’s Ladder, Misery, Def By Temptation, Joe Versus the Volcano

@TheMelaniac
Pump Up the Volume, Cry-Baby, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, Joe Versus the Volcano, Tremors

@zoomuzakgirl
Cry-Baby, Joe Versus the Volcano, Wild at Heart, Misery, Kindergarten Cop

@TonyTwistHNIC
Goodfellas, Edward Scissorhands, Miami Blues, Total Recall, Miller’s Crossing, Tremors, Quick Change, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Cry-Baby, Mermaids

@izicmo
Alice, Goodfellas, I Love You to Death, Miller’s Crossing, Paris is Burning, Presumed Innocent, Pump Up the Volume, Wild at Heart, Reversal of Fortune, La Femme Nikita

@ackack27
Miller’s Crossing, Total Recall, Goodfellas, Joe Versus the Volcano, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Edward Scissorhands, Dick Tracy, Miami Blues, Awakenings, My Blue Heaven

@jvcalbear
Internal Affairs, Presumed Innocent, The Two Jakes, Postcards from the Edge, Goodfellas, Avalon, The Godfather Part III, Kindergarten Cop

@dallasshaldune
Close-Up, Goodfellas, Miller’s Crossing, Days of Being Wild, Wild at Heart, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Q&A, Paris is Burning, Metropolitan, Ju Dou

@MagnetCarta
1. Goodfellas 2. Metropolitan 3. Tremors 4. Miller’s Crossing 5. Reversal of Fortune 6. Total Recall 7. The Hunt for Red October 8. The Grifters 9. Arachnophobia

@ArloLikesMovies
1. Goodfellas 2. Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams 3. Gremlins 2: The New Batch 4. Paris is Burning 5. Edward Scissorhands 6. Darkman 7. Miller’s Crossing 8. Misery 9. Tremors 10. Back to the Future Part III

@itistamara
Goodfellas, Misery, Metropolitan, Close-Up, I Love You to Death, House Party, Paris is Burning

@pacospecial
Wild at Heart, Goodfellas, Trust, Slacker, Mountains of the Moon, To Sleep with Anger, Jacob’s Ladder, Miller’s Crossing, Total Recall, King of New York 

@thejoshdean
Close-Up, Goodfellas, Metropolitan, Dances with Wolves, American Dream, Edward Scissorhands, Misery, Miller’s Crossing, Die Hard 2: Die Harder, The Godfather Part III

@Wombat849
Goodfellas, The Nights of Zayandeh-rood, King of New York, Miller’s Crossing, Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams, Misery, Blue Steel, Predator 2, Die Hard 2: Die Harder, Gremlins 2: The New Batch 

@buckly
Home Alone, Tremors, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Goodfellas, Robocop 2, Metropolitan, THe Exorcist III, Goodfellas, Edward Scissorhands, Cry-Baby

@mrcarmady
Metropolitan, Miller’s Crossing, Quick Change, Trust, Wild at Heart, Bullet in the Head, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Total Recall, Central Park, Goodfellas

Erik M. Gregersen (@erikgregerson)
Frankenstein Unbound, Miller’s Crossing, Close-Up. Branches of the Tree, Ju Dou, Monument, White Hunter Black Heart, Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams, The Nasty Girl

Lola Landekic (@lolamachine)
Paris is Burning, Postcards from the Edge, Goodfellas, Misery, Wild at Heart, Joe Versus the Volcano

Todd Vaziri (@tvaziri)
Dances with Wolves, Goodfellas, Predator 2, The Hunt for Red October, Presumed Innocent, Awakenings, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, The Exorcist III, Wild at Heart, Miller’s Crossing

@JasonGraff1
Goodfellas, Total Recall, Jacob’s Ladder, Miller’s Crossing, Wild at Heart, The Two Jakes, Reversal of Fortune, State of Grace, The Grifters, The Krays

@st_underwood
Total Recall, Tremors, The Hunt for Red October, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, The Grifters, Die Hard 2: Die Harder, Goodfellas, Arachnophobia, Pump Up the Volume, Darkman

@LucyBradley
Flatliners, The Godfather Part III, Presumed Innocent, Lord of the Flies, Edward Scissorhands, Ghost, Pump Up the Volume

@snarkout
Miller’s Crossing, The Grifters, Goodfellas, Jacob’s Ladder, Kiki’s Delivery Service, (1989, does not count), Bullet in the Head, Tremors, Truly Madly Deeply, Ju Dou, Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!, Edward Scissorhands

@sillyilly
Goodfellas, Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams, Close-Up, Bullet in the Head, To Sleep with Anger, King of New York, No Fear No Die, Alexandria Again and Forever (1989, does not count), Song of the Exile, Tilai

@MarioPrime
Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams

Murtada Elfadi (@ME_Says)
The Sheltering Sky, Paris is Burning, Goodfellas, Ju Dou, Postcards from the Edge, The Grifters, Reversal of Fortune, Internal Affairs, Ghost, Misery

@memerosies
Tremors

@a_wolfspider
Joe Versus the Volcano, Total Recall, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Quick Change, Metropolitan, The Exorcist III, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, Miller’s Crossing, Bride of Re-Animator (1989, does not count)

@wolfmanwalter13
1. Goodfellas 2. Total Recall 3. Tremors 4. The Hunt for Red October 5. Arachnophobia 6. Kindergarten Cop

@EdwinJDavies
Miller’s Crossing, Goodfellas, Wild at Heart, Days of Being Wild, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, The Exorcist III, Blue Steel, Total Recall, Metropolitan, Tremors

@salbonavia
To Sleep with Anger, Goodfellas, The Grifters, Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer (does not count), Joe Versus the Volcano, Miami Blues, Metropolitan

300

David Bax (@daveypretension)
Miller’s Crossing, Paris is Burning, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Cry-Baby, Joe Versus the Volcano, Blue Steel, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, The Reflecting Skin, Ju Dou, The Hairdresser’s Husband

@Ewan_M
Close-Up, I Hired a Contract Killer, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Days of Being Wild, Cloud-Paradise, Paris is Burning, King of New York, An Angel at My Table, Tilai, Step Across the Border

@AntonSirius
Blind Fury, Darkman, Days of Being Wild, Goodfellas, Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer (does not count), The Hunt for Red October, Miller’s Crossing, Pump Up the Volume, Quick Change, Tremors

@trappedinazorb
Days of Being Wild, The Match Factory Girl, Dick Tracy, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Yum, Yum, Yum! A Taste of Creole and Cajun Cooking

@shinbowi3
The Sound of the Shaking Earth, Bullet in the Head, Song of the Exile, Days of Being Wild, A Moment of Romance, Encounter of the Spooky Kind 2, Welcome to Tokyo, Look Out, Officer!, Thazhavaram, The Sting of Death 

@fanangogroover
Goodfellas, Wild at Heart, The Killer (does not count), Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!, Miller’s Crossing, La Femme Nikita, The Hunt for Red October, Memphis Belle, Mo’ Better Blues, Truly Madly Deeply

@jjkamensky
Tremors, Metropolitan, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, American Dream, Wild at Heart, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, Darkman, Miller’s Crossing, Goodfellas, Trust

@samgraay
Miller’s Crossing, Trust, King of New York, Goodfellas, Avalon, To Sleep with Anger, Close-Up, An Angel at My Table

@RadiantBaby
1. Goodfellas 2. To Sleep with Anger 3. King of New York 4. Total Recall 5. Wild at Heart 6. Begotten 7. Miller’s Crossing 8. Blue Steel 9. Mo’ Better Blues 10. Misery

@mdbiondo
Total Recall, Goodfellas, Die Hard 2: Die Harder, The Hunt for Red October, Cry-Baby, I Love You to Death, Wild at Heart, Miller’s Crossing, Slacker, The Godfather Part III

@BaronVonMunch
Edward Scissorhands, Goodfellas, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Arachnophobia, The Rescuers Down Under, Miller’s Crossing

@EBCCogswell
Goodfellas, Metropolitan, Edward Scissorhands, Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams, Miller’s Crossing, Days of Being Wild, Alice, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, The Witches, Paris is Burning

@PaulBoyne
1. Edward Scissorhands 2. The Rescuers Down Under 3. Dick Tracy 4. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead 5. Goodfellas 6. Miller’s Crossing 7. Cyrano de Bergerac 8. The Match Factory Girl 9. Back to the Future Part III 10. Paris is Burning 

Andrew Draper (@apdraper2000)
1. The Russia House 2. Jacob’s Ladder 3. Tremors 4. Gremlins 2: The New Batch 5. The Exorcist III 6. Internal Affairs 

@ChrisBeaubien
Goodfellas, The Grifters, Darkman, The Reflecting Skin, Edward Scissorhands, Reversal of Fortune, The Krays, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Miller’s Crossing, The Match Factory Girl 

@AmbroseCoghill
1. Close-Up 2. Goodfellas 3. Miller’s Crossing 4. Life is Sweet 5. Metropolitan 6. The Unbelievable Truth (1989, does not count) 7. The Match Factory Girl 8. Paris is Burning 9. Wild at Heart 10. Mo’ Better Blues

@AlexanderFrentz
1. My Blue Heaven 2. It 3. Quick Change 4. Edward Scissorhands 5. Pacific Heights

Ryan McNeil (@matinee_ca)
1. Goodfellas 2. Miller’s Crossing 3. Pump Up the Volume 4. Wild at Heart 5. The Grifters 6. Postcards from the Edge 7. Misery 8. Ghost 9. Edward Scissorhands 10. Die Hard 2: Die Harder

@Cabsgotadent
Miller’s Crossing, Goodfellas, White Hunter Black Heart, Internal Affairs, The Nasty Girl, King of New York, Misery

@SinisterMC
1. The Witches 2. Gremlins 2: The New Batch 3. Mermaids 4. Prayer of the Rollerboys 5. Dick Tracy 6. Cry-Baby 7. Arachnophobia 8. Misery 9. Troll 2 10. Home Alone

Zine Peek: Top Ten By Year: 1978 – The Shout


Two weeks ago the Top Ten By Year: 1978 zine became available to purchase on my etsy page. It is a variety of collage, illustration, and celebration of the films of 1978, including write-ups on my ten favorites. For both this and my previous issue (1943), my plan was to rewatch the films and revise what I’d originally written years ago when I chose these years for my Top Ten By Year project (in which I spend 6 months to over a year with a particular year in film). What I quickly found was that none of it was nearly good enough to include. In the end, a handful of thoughts remained, but almost everything I wrote for both zines is entirely new.

I want to give people a peek at what I wrote, and hopefully, if you like it and would like to see more, you’ll consider picking up a copy. I’ll post three write-ups from each. Here is the second I’m sharing from 1978, on Jerzy Skolimowski’s The Shout. It is my #10 of that year.

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“Every word of what I’m going to tell you is true. Only I’m telling it in a different way. It’s always the same story…it’s always the same story but I…I change the sequence of events, and I vary the climaxes a little, because I like to keep it alive you see. I like to keep it alive”. 

Two men keep score of an asylum cricket game that unfolds with a kind of waiting-room menace, as if the world may end as soon as one team wins. One of the men tells the other a story, a story about aboriginal magicks in the English countryside, a story with unreliable layers of remove before we even begin. There is an air of Caligari to this framing device, the disturbed living in a limbo where the mix of delusion and reality exists in a beguiling muddle. Of course it’s a cricket game. Cricket makes no goddamn sense to the eye, but there is an order and logic to it we cannot see or know. I may as well be describing The Shout.

The central couple in Crossley’s (Alan Bates) tale are more placeholders than people. John Hurt is terminally aloof, and Suzannah York all-too soon becomes a symbol of sexual submission and the conqueror conquering. We meet them as they wake from a shared apparition of an aboriginal man in a tailcoat. The wife notices that her belt buckle is missing. They just woke up, and unbeknownst to them they’ve already lost the hearth and themselves. There are no clear motivations. Why them, why here? This is a reality where visions, the vessels of the inanimate, and especially the sonic, are what dictate will, power, and fate. Where everything may be a lie, or worse, everything may be true. Where people can be controlled as long as you have their belt buckle, or trap their soul in a stone.

Crossley claims to have obtained the “Terror Shout” from a shaman, a deafening scream that has the power to immediately kill anyone or anything within earshot. Anthony (Hurt) is a composer who spends his time experimenting with sound by manipulating electronics and everyday objects, unlocking what they hold within. An early sequence shows him recording various sounds, such as marbles and water rolling around together on an aluminum baking sheet. Throughout the film, there is an awareness of the potential for the extraordinary by what is put into and brought out of the ordinary. But in The Shout, the extraordinary uniformly manifests itself in the evils of the fantastic. We are thus trained to be more attuned to sound moving forward, to listen with a keen ear of curiosity and unease — to listen with the ears of a musician…or a wizard. The Shout weaves an aural tapestry for us, with an innovative 4-channel Dolby mix, one of the first of its kind, and an ambient and subdued synth score by Tony Banks and Michael Rutherford of Genesis.

There is a moment when, yanked down into position, Suzannah York recreates a Francis Bacon work seen on an inconspicuous clipping on Hurt’s studio wall. Director Jerzy Skolimowski doesn’t over-telegraph this recreation. He creates an uncanny familiarity, giving you just enough to know you’ve seen that pose somewhere before, and what the hell does it mean that you’re seeing it again? Is it part of Crossley’s power over the house that creates these mirror images, part of the film’s conveyances, or the inanimate’s surplus of energy? Any or all? These are the kind of patterns (this one more direct than the rest of the film) that make up the film. Watching it you feel first dislodged, then powerless. Even the opening credits, in which a man zig-zags his way through a shot grainy enough to be Bigfoot footage, are hazy and out of reach. The Shout leaves you engulfed in layers of suspicious supernatural uncertainty as you go off into the world acutely aware of your own corporeal limitations .

Zine Peek: Top Ten By Year: 1943 – The Seventh Victim


Two weeks ago the Top Ten By Year: 1978 zine became available to purchase on my etsy page. It is a variety of collage, illustration, and celebration of the films of 1978, including write-ups on my ten favorites. In February I released one for 1943. For both projects, my plan was to rewatch the films and revise what I’d originally written years ago when I chose these years for my Top Ten By Year project (in which I spend 6 months to over a year with a particular year in film). What I quickly found was that none of it was nearly good enough to include. In the end, a handful of thoughts remained, but almost everything I wrote for both zines is entirely new.

I want to give people a peek at what I wrote, and hopefully, if you like it and would like to see more, you’ll consider picking up a copy. I’ll post three write-ups from each. Here is the first from 1943: The Seventh Victim.

hu

The inescapable lure of death is a hell of a thing to make your movie about. The Seventh Victim‘s philosophy, which producer-auteur Val Lewton admitted flat-out, is to embrace death. It’s a shocking statement, for 1943 or 2019; one that RKO only got away with because the film wasn’t top brass enough for anyone to notice. The Satanists are not the enemy. They are an empty placeholder, an unsuccessful attempt for Jacqueline (Jean Brooks) to find escape from her melancholia (in fact, the cult is seen as similarly desperate – a mundane and lost group). Jacqueline dons a fur coat while her jet black hair frames her face with severity; a protective shield from the world. Her eyes are large lost pools of hope hanging on by a thread.

The Seventh Victim is existential horror packaged as a detective story. On the surface, the film is guided by Kim Hunter’s (in her debut) search for her missing sister, but she (and us) are actually guided by recurring images of hanging nooses, locked rooms, and staircases. Everything feels like it’s communicated, whether visually or through dialogue, with the weight of the forbidden. In a pre-Psycho shower scene, murder is not committed, but vital information and threats are passed through curtain and shadow while water drips off Hunter’s shoulders (side note: this movie is pretty gay, yet another plus!).

We are with Jacqueline through the final act. Hunter, the lame poet, and the inconsequential husband have been a means to an end. Her walk through the streets, as she flees a pursuer, is a walk of the mind. She resists and finds escape, but it’s futile. Her search for a light at the end of the tunnel is conveyed through the lighting, the unwanted bacchanal celebrations of a theater troupe her only out. And then there’s that profound exchange with Mimi (Elizabeth Russell), a dying specter who makes herself known in the final minutes. The scene stops me dead in my tracks every time. Mimi defiantly chooses to meet death through living. Jacqueline, once again without answers, limps resignedly towards hers. At that crucial moment they meet in the middle. Both headed towards the same fate (as are we all), which they’ll arrive at in very different ways for very different reasons. The Seventh Victim may look like it’s about missing sisters and Satanists, but it’s not. To Die or Not To Die: that is the question.

Zine Peek: Top Ten By Year: 1978 – The Fury


Two weeks ago the Top Ten By Year: 1978 zine became available to purchase on my etsy page. It is a variety of collage, illustration, and celebration of the films of 1978, including write-ups on my ten favorites. For both this and my previous issue (1943), my plan was to rewatch the films and revise what I’d originally written years ago when I chose these years for my Top Ten By Year project (in which I spend 6 months to over a year with a particular year in film). What I quickly found was that none of it was nearly good enough to include. In the end, a handful of thoughts remained, but almost everything I wrote for both zines is entirely new.

I want to give people a peek at what I wrote, and hopefully, if you like it and would like to see more, you’ll consider picking up a copy. I’ll post three write-ups from each. Here is the second I’m sharing from 1978, on Brian De Palma’s The Fury. It is my #3 of that year.

960_the_fury_blu-ray_08_The Fury is the best X-Men film ever made, and in an ideal world it’d be considered a model for what pop cinema can be. But as Brian De Palma’s follow-up to his masterpiece Carrie it was destined to disappoint, in part because of how much they have in common. Both are based on novels about a telekinetic girl. Both feature Amy Irving as an empath who tries and fails to save a peer-in-need. And both enjoy playing at an offbeat pitch; but while Carrie does so within an unmistakable horror designation, The Fury is an ice cream sundae of genres – a coming-of-age supernatural espionage government conspiracy horror-thriller. Got all that? Add an experimentally self-reflexive cherry on top, and you have a film that audiences and critics did not, and largely still don’t, know what to make of. But to De Palma devotees (and some film devotees) it is an essential work, and an irresistible opportunity for writers to intellectualize De Palma’s relationship with cinema through cinema. It’s an exercise that often, for all its worth, makes the film itself sound like a narrative thesis. There is often a clinical disconnect that obscures The Fury’s entertaining and emotional immediacy.

Watching The Fury, the main thing you notice is that even through its early slower section it is blisteringly alive, as if De Palma has some unspoken knowledge that this will be the last film he ever makes (spoiler alert: it wasn’t). It is so in tune with its own wavelength, and with the emotional stakes of its characters, that the preposterously schlocky story feels like it matters (this is greatly helped by John Williams’s momentous Herrmann-eqsue score, by turns eerie, epic, and playful. “For Gillian” is his Harry Potter before Harry Potter). It maintains the same two-fold hold on me every time I watch it — a mix of uncommonly strong investment in the characters and story, and a near-constant awe at its formal power. With an opening set-piece that involves a betrayal by way of (who else but?) John Cassavetes, a terrorist attack, a kidnapping, and a shirtless 62 year-old Kirk Douglas letting loose with a machine gun, an “all-aboard!” line is drawn in the sand. Either hop on or get ready for a long two hours.

That ice cream sundae also contains eccentric pockets of comic relief. Scenes open on oddball peripheral characters, whether it’s the cop who just got a brand new car, the little old lady who delights in helping out a trespasser, or the two security guards who pass the time by negotiating trades of Hershey bars and coffee (it also has the priceless reveal that the elderly Kirk Douglas’s ingenious disguise is to make himself look, wait for it, old!). All that Kirk and quirk gradually give way to the more sincerely executed dilemmas of the teenage Gillian (Amy Irving in a performance that belongs in my personal canon), a new student at the Paragon Institute coming to grips with her increasingly cataclysmic and all-seeing powers.

It’s trademark De Palma to toy around with the nature of cinema, and as The Fury unfolds it begins to self-engage, reaching back into itself in ways that are still hard to fully fathom. Gillian’s telekinetic link to the missing Robin (Andrew Stevens) is depicted visually, including us in the intimate and exclusive psychic link they share. Since Gillian’s visions are triggered by touch and experienced by sight, she acquires information by watching scenes play out in front of, or all around, her. She learns and we learn through her. She becomes submerged in cinema — part of the audience. Gillian experiences harrowing psychic access to Robin, and through the immediacy of the filmmaking we are given that same experiential access to Gillian. This is cinema as the ultimate form of communication, information (surveillance is a recurring theme here too, another De Palma favorite), and feeling, seen as capable of transcending the confines of the screen. As part of his brainwashing, Robin is even shown the first five minutes of the film. Cinema weaponized and all that jazz.

The tricks in De Palma’s formal playbook make all this possible. The editing (at times flickering in-and-out like a flip-book) and rear-screen projection are used to emphasize and envelop. Characters are brought together by overlapping space and sound. The camera often tracks conversation by circling around characters, knowing that the more an image changes, the more we can percieve. A bravura slow-motion sequence turns the notion of the escape scene into a cathartic reverie gone wrong. It isn’t until the end that we realize the slow-motion is in fact stretching out a character’s final moments. It is the perfect encapsulation of how De Palma, at his best, uses pure stylization to not only enhance, but become emotion. Gillian’s shake-ridden fright and confusion, Hester’s (Carrie Snodgress) heartache and longing, and Peter (Douglas) facing the consequences of his quest, are all deeply palpable through this fusion of performance and form.

The Fury carries the devastating punch of his most emotional works like Carrie, Blow Out, or Carlito’s Way, but without the ever-lingering bleak aftertaste. It hijacks the senseless loss that came before with a vengeful ascendance so absolute it can only be called the money shot to end all money shots. And it wouldn’t be The Fury if it didn’t replay from every imaginable angle — wiping our memory out with pure orgasmic vindication.

Zine Peek: Top Ten By Year: 1978 – Coming Home


Two weeks ago, the Top Ten By Year: 1978 zine became available to purchase on my etsy page. It is a variety of collage, illustration, and celebration of the films of 1978. I’d written about my ten favorites in 2015 (the year of my 1978 deep dive), and my plan was to rewatch and revise everything to improve what was there. What I quickly found was that none of it was nearly good enough to include. There are a handful of thoughts that remain, but everything I wrote for the zine is entirely new.

I want to give people a peek at what I wrote, and hopefully, if you like it and would like to see more, you’ll consider picking up a copy. I’ll post three write-ups each from the 1943 (which was similarly revised almost from scratch) and 1978 zines. I will also be doing this for the 1943 zine.

So, here is my write-up on Hal Ashby and company’s Coming Home. It is my #2 of 1978.

coming home

Coming Home delivers its message by way of human texture and deference. 1978 marks the year Hollywood began to grapple with the atrocities of the Vietnam War (this and the harrowing collapse-of-camaraderie film The Deer Hunter were both nominated for Best Picture). But Hollywood didn’t decide to make Coming Home; Jane Fonda did. And she brought in collaborators (director Hal Ashby, stars Jon Voight and Bruce Dern, cinematographer Haskell Wexler, producer Jerome Hellman, etc) that, like her, were coming from a place of long-time activism and grievance. Together they came up with one of the most empathetic films ever made (Coming Home is full of one-of-the-mosts of mine), a film about the basic need for human connection in times of uncertainty and ruin. Their research on the stories and struggles of those who returned home held significant sway, and they shot at an active veterans hospital, incorporating the patients and their conversations into the film (Jon Voight and Robert Carradine are the only actors among the hundred plus credited). It is by some miracle (that miracle being the people involved) that they never feel like exploited window dressing. The film opens with patients playing pool and speaking unscripted about the war. Originally, Jon Voight was meant to chime in, but as they shot the only thing that felt right was to stay silent. Instead, he is seen listening intently with his head down, his real-life respect becomes Luke’s pain. This is what I mean by deference.

Hal Ashby’s camera was always one of sensitive objectivity: simply put, he can see. He’s often far away (because of the lenses he favors, even when he’s close he’s far), taking in the whole before finding the details. This sense of discovery with a documentarian’s eye – seen in, for example, every shot from the Fourth of July picnic – contains a decree that we also see, and become one with the camera’s discoveries. It is through this that the film finds its uncommon compassion, allowing the actors to seamlessly integrate themselves with the environment and each other.

Ashby’s hang-back approach (he and Altman really are kindred spirits) facilitates another crucial rarity about Coming Home: it’s one of the sexiest films ever made. I challenge you to show me anything as erotic as the way Jon Voight looks at Jane Fonda in this movie (Voight’s work here is critical to my love of Coming Home; a hugely important performance to me, one of rare lived-in emotional access). The two dance around that most charged of scenarios; the anticipatory zone before anything happen, when the tiniest touch, gaze, or exchange is liable to occupy your daydreams (“You know, I spend 95% of the time at the hospital thinking of making love with you”). The realm of unconsummated desire. Their desire functions as a kind of healing, as a way for the broken and abandoned to put themselves together again. The reason it’s so sexy, besides the chemistry between Voight and Fonda, is that nobody is in communication with the camera. Every touch, gaze, and exchange is caught or glimpsed. The camera is not a participant or a voyeur, but an observer, freeing up the actors to share space and immerse themselves with their characters and each other (for instance, the scene at the beach between Luke and Sally regarding Bob’s return was shot with an 800mm lens, placing the camera over 400 yards away from the actors). Their romance never feels constructed for us. Between the performances, and the camera’s unobtrusive and intimate observations, the intimacy we see and feel is amplified.

Hal Ashby is well-known for integrating music into his films, and in Coming Home it’s a throughline — a blank check catalog of the era (it may understandably read as Cliche City to some — there are 5 Rolling Stones songs. 5!), but it stitches together the frequent cross-cutting and provides structural cohesion for the observational filmmaking. Whether unassuming or front-and-center, the music always plays over the scenes. It never punctuates or syncs up with any individual moment or action (in general, this is how music used to be employed – it was much less in conversation with the onscreen moment-to-moment than recent decades). It is used as a blanket of meaning and subsiding impact. Through the music, Sally, Luke, and Bob are unified by the pain of their era and entwined fates. It is thus that “Out of Time” plays over the opening credits, as Bruce Dern’s straight able-bodied jog is cross-cut with an influx of clashing steel and wheels within hospital hallways. And it is thus that we close with divergent ends paralleled, as Tim Buckley’s “Once I Was” shelters the hopeful and the hopeless as they co-exist with overwhelming totality.

Top Ten By Year: 1949 #1 – Bitter Rice (Italy / De Santis)


Previous Top Ten By Year lists:
1935, 1983, 1965, 1943, 1992, 1978, 1925, 1969
1930

Previous Top Ten By Year: 1949 Posts:
Top Ten By Year: 1949 – Poll Results
100 Images from the Films of 1949
What I’ll Remember About the Films of 1949: A Love Letter
#10. The Queen of Spades (UK/Dickinson)
#9. Rendezvous in July (Becker)/Au royaume des cieux (Duvivier) (France)
#8. Too Late for Tears (US / Haskin)
#7. The Heiress (US / Wyler)
#6. The Set-Up (US / Wise)
#5. Caught (US / Ophüls)
#4. The Passionate Friends (UK / Lean)
#3. Puce Moment (US / Anger)
#2. The Third Man (UK / Reed)

For those unaware of my Top Ten By Year project:
The majority of my viewing habits have been dictated by this project since September of 2013. Jumping to a different decade each time, I choose comparatively weaker years for me re: quantity of films seen/quantity of films loved. I use list-making as a way to see more films and revisit others in a structured and project-drive way. I was sick of spending too much time trying to decide what to watch, or watching films just to cross them off another dumb canon list. I wanted to engage. I wanted films to be enhanced by others, by looking at a specific moment in time. I wanted something that led me to seeing or revisiting things I might not have gotten to otherwise. Lastly, my lists are based on personal favorites, not any weird notion of an objective best.

This is the first year I’ll be doing separate posts for each film. #9 will go up Monday. After that, one will go up each day until the end. Then I’ll post them all together so they are gathered in one place. There are a lot of films I loved that did not make the cut. In particular, Flamingo Road, Such a Pretty Little Beach, On the Town, Inspirace, The Reckless Moment, Reign of Terror, The Rocking Horse Winner, and Samson and Delilah are all films I thought at one point would be on here. Of all of these, Flamingo Road was a sure thing until it wasn’t at the very last minute. Please go watch it.

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#1. Bitter Rice (Italy / De Santis) (first-time watch)
Two women and two cultures intertwined.

There are two sides to Bitter Rice. One has neorealism, Silvana, and Italy. The other has film noir, Francesca, and America. When all is said and done these two women will have swapped places, for better and much worse. And when Italy’s other neorealist filmmakers see Bitter Rice, they will take it as a betrayal of truth and the political. In short, they hated it. In this time of crucial political upheaval when neorealism carried legitimate cultural cache, director Giuseppe De Santis had made something too slick, too tawdry, and too American. The message was tarnished by the method. But De Santis was a Marxist who happened to admire and study John Ford, King Vidor, and the visual patterns of Hollywood studio filmmaking. He saw mass appeal as a way to both entertain and denounce, and made a film in which neorealism is hijacked and reconfigured to be a noir melodrama.

Bitter Rice has a lot of recognizably neorealist markers; location shooting, a focus on labor and economic struggle, the tactile particulars of rice worker life, and the use of the specific cultural practices such as the choral Coralita. The sound of women wading through water, the way it would around their legs, and the strain of being hunched over day after day — it’s all made vivid. But it is easy to see why Bitter Rice would seem a betrayal. Its mutinous synthesis of “authenticity” and artificiality was a signpost towards neorealism’s end. Soon there would be stars, genre, production in the Italian film industry.

The synthesis is clear from the very first scene. The authenticity of the mondine (female rice workers) is introduced with grandiosity and sweep. There are no docu-elements here, but plenty of elaborate tracking and crane shots to go around, the kind of gradually encompassing images you’d be more likely to find in a DeMille epic. Watching the very first scene I thought: “Wait — what am I in for?”. All preconceived notions were immediately scrapped, and I realized my trip to the rice fields of Po Valley would be a very different one indeed. Then, a couple carrying stolen jewels are chased into the station waiting to transport the workers to the fields. Their arrival feels like an alien invasion, as if some freak chemical accident at the film lab spilled one film into another. This dichotomy plays throughout with electric and arresting cohesion, making it so distinctly unlike any other film from its movement.

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While De Santis was inspired by the Hollywood narrative format, he also uses American culture’s insidious postwar presence to illustrate the dangers of breaking from solidarity for hollow (the fake jewels!) individual gain. This is done using the two incredible and complex women of Bitter Rice‘s center. After Francesca the Moll (Doris Dowling, an American actress) is forced to assimilate in the rice fields, she finds purpose among the mondine. In order to stay in hiding, she has to advocate for the rights of her fellow non-contract workers. But this is never done as a means to an end. Francesca never schemes to stay on; she is always shown as sincerely leading the protests for the group. Life becomes bigger than herself, and she learns to stand both as her own woman, and as part of the mondine.

Francesca also begins to see her personal life more clearly. You get the sense that despite loving Walter (Vittorio Gassman), she is not blind to how reprehensible he is (I mean, in the first scene he literally used her as a human shield so….). But she had nowhere to go, and no strength to pull away. Life in Po Valley gives her that strength. The value of the collective is present throughout, with choral scenes, aerial shots showcasing the lines of working women linked together, and fragments of peripheral characters and their various troubles. They push themselves to the brink under oppressive conditions just to make it to the next job, and there is power in their (at times friction-filled) solidarity (I was also reminded of last year’s Support the Girls, also about a community of women united by unforgiving labor).

Then there is the shrewd but naive young Silvana (Silvana Mangano, who I’ll talk about later), a peasant that dreams of wealth. She is seduced by all things coded America and money (she should talk to Caught’s Leonora!). We first meet her doing the boogie woogie (she does a lot of dancing, employed for seduction and statement). In this group of women, where everyone is introduced as part of a whole, she immediately stands out as modern. She chews gum, loves big-band, and is seen reading photo-romances, the then-popular prepackaged fantasies that were read by lower and working class Italian women. Silvana wants out; she longs for adventure, riches, and a certain kind of romance. But the way out that presents itself is a different kind of way out, and she is too blinded by inexperience to understand it.


The camera links Francesca and Silvana all the time. Whether in two-shots or individual spaces, there is an invisible tether between them. Their lives and fates take part in a film-length body-swap. Silvana talks about fate a lot, but is seen making deliberate choices towards certain doom. She can’t see Walter for what he is — an exploiter and a monster. But Francesca gives her an out, replaying about her life with Walter and the terrible things he has done. She tries to take the abuse and hardship she lived through and save someone else from making the mistakes she did. But Silvana can’t see past the jewels and the suit. There is only the potential for excitement, for something that is not this. After all, Walter “looks like a gentleman” (aka a hotshot gumshoe); so he must be, right? While Francesca’s transformation is one of victorious camaraderie, Silvana’s (both actress and character) is altogether much murkier; one marked by punishment.

Silvana Mangano never wanted her body to represent the whole of Italy, but it did. Audiences were scandalized just seeing the unapologetically full female form (au natural, code for Armpit Hair), the kind that becomes sexualized simply by existing. She was the prototype of the “earthy women” that would cause such a stir overseas (later embodied by Gina Lollobrigida and Sophia Loren). She started out by winning Miss Rome, a post-war contest that further enhanced the idea of body-as-nation, and an honor that became synonymous with future screen tests. Unlike Lollobrigida and Loren, Mangano didn’t cash in on overseas notoriety for a Hollywood career. She became resentful of her image, and of fame, eventually giving herself a drastic reinvention (her figure was now svelte and arch, her look cold) and starring in art films by Pasolini and Visconti in the late 1960s and 1970s (and Dune!).

The camera doesn’t ogle Mangano Tex Avery style; this isn’t Jane Russell in The Outlaw. But it aims to stay back, taking in the whole of her whenever possible. And you can’t help but take part in that — I love looking at her. She is the textbook case for why the male gaze is not an open-and-shut case. For all its appallingly absolute authority on the almost-whole of filmic language, women enjoy it too! One of the great joys of watching films is watching bodies, both male and female. I am hypnotized and, yes, completely turned on by Silvana Mangano in Bitter Rice. The camera may not be that Tex Avery wolf, but I’ll admit that I am.

Critics felt her body, and Bitter Rice’s eroticism as represented by her, cheapened the film and nullified its political message. Yet a crucial part of its political message is the punishment her and her body endures for betraying the homeland (a tactic that opens up a whole other can of worms). She is eroticized, symbolic, made into a cautionary tale. Her final fugue march is just like Ann Todd’s in The Passionate Friends. Claude Rains gets there in time. Francesca cannot.

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(TW: rape, sexual assault)
She is raped. It is a rape that takes away her body. We don’t see much of it after that. In those last thirty minutes she is made up of haunted black pupils, lit like she’s telling a ghost story. She is immediately ostracized by the filmmaking, quarantined off in shots of the mondine in ways you feel more than see. It’s not obvious, but intrinsic and heartbreaking. The most startling example takes place immediately following her assault. It is pouring out (during these scenes a stunning rain shower falls right in front of the camera like a curtain) and the women have banded together, refusing to let the weather set them behind schedule. Silvana walks in a daze, confused and in shock. Ahead, a sick woman who shouldn’t be out in her condition begins having an attack. She howls out, and begins writhing in pain as the women surround her and hold her down. They begin to sing in an attempt to calm her (they are all one). Silvana looks on in horror. This is a mirror image of what she just went through, her trauma reflecting right back at her. She is watching herself. She begins to scream. She is drowned out, not part of the coralita, not part of anything anymore. Her cries go unheard.

The meat locker finale is one last compare-and-contrast session. Both women have guns. Both women have a man beside them. One is shaking and shaken. The other is determined and resolute. Francesca is still trying to save the other end of the tether. There is something so moving and uncommon in Francesca’s committed efforts to protect Silvana despite the harm she causes and rivalry she insists on. It’s hard to put into words how much I love these women, these characters, these performances. Bitter Rice pays such close attention to how women communicate with each other (in both speech and body language, the silent glares and stares may as well be full conversations), and to the breadth of female experience, struggle, and loyalty. We see how hard it is for Francesca to break away from Walter. We see that Silvana’s sense of right and wrong are muddied by what she wants out of life. We see that Silvana’s actions are not unfeeling; there is such pain on her face as she undoes the mondine’s hard work. The list goes on as more layers are pulled back.

Watching Bitter Rice is that all-too rare sensation of not knowing where a film is headed, or what story it will tell (unless you’ve read this before watching). Francesca and Silvana are often hard to read. By the end, that body swap trajectory is clear, but only at the end. And despite the larger-than-life symbolic statuses they represent, they are two of the most layered and human women I’ve ever seen onscreen. They don’t fit into any neat box — not within neorealism, and not within noir. Francesca and Silvana are with me now, and I’m the better for it.

Top Ten By Year: 1949 #2 – The Third Man (UK / Reed)


Previous Top Ten By Year lists:
1935, 1983, 1965, 1943, 1992, 1978, 1925, 1969
1930

Previous Top Ten By Year: 1949 Posts:
Top Ten By Year: 1949 – Poll Results
100 Images from the Films of 1949
What I’ll Remember About the Films of 1949: A Love Letter
#10. The Queen of Spades (UK/Dickinson)
#9. Rendezvous in July (Becker)/Au royaume des cieux (Duvivier) (France)
#8. Too Late for Tears (US / Haskin)
#7. The Heiress (US / Wyler)
#6. The Set-Up (US / Wise)
#5. Caught (US / Ophüls)
#4. The Passionate Friends (UK / Lean)
#3. Puce Moment (US / Anger)

For those unaware of my Top Ten By Year project:
The majority of my viewing habits have been dictated by this project since September of 2013. Jumping to a different decade each time, I choose comparatively weaker years for me re: quantity of films seen/quantity of films loved. I use list-making as a way to see more films and revisit others in a structured and project-drive way. I was sick of spending too much time trying to decide what to watch, or watching films just to cross them off another dumb canon list. I wanted to engage. I wanted films to be enhanced by others, by looking at a specific moment in time. I wanted something that led me to seeing or revisiting things I might not have gotten to otherwise. Lastly, my lists are based on personal favorites, not any weird notion of an objective best.

This is the first year I’ll be doing separate posts for each film. #9 will go up Monday. After that, one will go up each day until the end. Then I’ll post them all together so they are gathered in one place. There are a lot of films I loved that did not make the cut. In particular, Flamingo Road, Such a Pretty Little Beach, On the Town, Inspirace, The Reckless Moment, Reign of Terror, The Rocking Horse Winner, and Samson and Delilah are all films I thought at one point would be on here. Of all of these, Flamingo Road was a sure thing until it wasn’t at the very last minute. Please go watch it.

the-third-man-image1890

#2. The Third Man (UK / Reed) (rewatch)

How corny and obvious to say, but it’s true; every time you watch The Third Man you think “Wow, people made this and now we have it and it’s a thing that exists, how beautiful is that?” It humbles you, bringing you back to the basics of discovery. Every time you watch it’s hard to leave it. The sum of its particulars transcend genre or any other label it might be tempting to assign it. Its time and place feel far too specific for noir; noir is The City, a monolith of shady affairs and shadier alleyways. But this is the post-war Vienna film, belonging only to itself.

Because The Third Man doesn’t quite feel like anything else. Anton Karas’s jaunty and iconic zither score is gleefully intrusive, forcing the film to pace itself off a merry-go-round bemusement. The music keeps everything in brisk forward motion, nudging its characters to move along now everyone, move along (Reed completely forgoes the score in the sewers, opting for echoes and trudging footsteps). This is made clear in the opening off-the-cuff narration, which runs down an expository list of black markets and post-war zone layouts against footage that insists on hopping away every other second.

The unorthodox soundtrack joins forces with the canted angles; World War II has knocked the Earth off its axis. The Third Man reflects that by adopting a cocked camera, a permanently raised eyebrow. Question everything but do it with a twinkle in your eye, that’s the spirit of this film. Repartee is currency while shifty characters commingle with shifty characters and everyone knows more than you do. This vision of Allied-occupied post-war Vienna is an alienating place of sectors and disparities. It’s overrun and the frames are often packed in. But the streets are empty. This labyrinth of ruined decadence. The milky-glow of the cobblestones and crumbled angles (courtesy of Robert Krasker who, no big deal, gifts us with arguably the most beautiful black-and-white film ever made) make up a city in the process of picking up its pieces but not yet able to put itself back together again.

When I think of Holly Martins, I hear Dennis Hopper in action masterpiece Speed, exclaiming to Keanu: “You’ve got blinders on to the world!” This penniless dimestore novelist has a case of the chronic misreads. He enters into a world he isn’t part of to see the best friend he’s barely been in touch with for “some sort, I don’t know, some sort of job” the narrator tells us. And yet he is positive that old chum Harry Lime couldn’t possibly be mixed up in nefarious dealings. He has assigned himself the role of Hero, Major Calloway the Villain, Anna the Love Interest, and Harry the Wrong Man. The only problem is that not one of these matches reality, and that is the hard lesson that awaits him. Graham Greene’s all-timer script denigrates Martins without making a joke of him. We simply wait for him to catch up with us. Joseph Cotten makes Holly’s lowkey haplessness and buffoonery (“a parrot bit me”) satisfyingly human.

Meanwhile, Harry Lime’s iconic entrance is even better when you register that he never even meant to be seen and had seamlessly pivoted into the moment for the theatrics. It’s a moment so perfect that it manages to stand out even in this film (hell, there’s even a kitten!). There’s nothing new to say about Orson Welles’s Harry Lime (or, let’s face it, The Third Man) except to reiterate that I’ve never seen a man make ego more appealing. The effect of seeing him onscreen is that he is so obviously up to no good, but his accelerated charm is so completely infectious that he becomes a one-man obstacle course towards activating the moral self. He becomes inconcievably larger-than-life because every scene, every conversation in the film is about this unseen (supposedly dead!) man. Then he shows up long enough to make a series of viciously flippant remarks about the value of human life before skedaddling off (the urge to shout “no, wait, don’t go, you just got here!” is strong), and all you think is how much you love this guy despite the things coming out of his mouth. I had forgotten about the chipper “ok byeeee” nature of Harry Lime’s exit (“So long Holly!”) immediately following the cuckoo clock speech. It’s in sync with the way he delivers all his lines, his baritone rumble spinning out its own rhythm so that you can’t tell where sentences end or begin.

Lastly, there is Anna (Alida Valli). Convention dictates that Anna is a woman of many secrets. But she isn’t; there are some fake passports but that’s about it. She simply loves Harry. Even though he has left her in the lurch, she is committed to staying loyal to him no matter what she learns. There is no affair. She simply cannot return Holly’s love. The Third Man ends with Anna’s forthright walk through the autumnal street; past Holly, past us. Through two funerals, she shuns the living through her loyalty to the dead. And then there’s Holly, alone but newly aware, left to realign himself with a world off its axis.

Top Ten By Year: 1949 #3 – Puce Moment (US / Anger)


Previous Top Ten By Year lists:
1935, 1983, 1965, 1943, 1992, 1978, 1925, 1969
1930

Previous Top Ten By Year: 1949 Posts:
Top Ten By Year: 1949 – Poll Results
100 Images from the Films of 1949
What I’ll Remember About the Films of 1949: A Love Letter
#10. The Queen of Spades (UK/Dickinson)
#9. Rendezvous in July (Becker)/Au royaume des cieux (Duvivier) (France)
#8. Too Late for Tears (US / Haskin)
#7. The Heiress (US / Wyler)
#6. The Set-Up (US / Wise)
#5. Caught (US / Ophüls)
#4. The Passionate Friends (UK / Lean)

For those unaware of my Top Ten By Year project:
The majority of my viewing habits have been dictated by this project since September of 2013. Jumping to a different decade each time, I choose comparatively weaker years for me re: quantity of films seen/quantity of films loved. I use list-making as a way to see more films and revisit others in a structured and project-drive way. I was sick of spending too much time trying to decide what to watch, or watching films just to cross them off another dumb canon list. I wanted to engage. I wanted films to be enhanced by others, by looking at a specific moment in time. I wanted something that led me to seeing or revisiting things I might not have gotten to otherwise. Lastly, my lists are based on personal favorites, not any weird notion of an objective best.

This is the first year I’ll be doing separate posts for each film. #9 will go up Monday. After that, one will go up each day until the end. Then I’ll post them all together so they are gathered in one place. There are a lot of films I loved that did not make the cut. In particular, Flamingo Road, Such a Pretty Little Beach, On the Town, Inspirace, The Reckless Moment, Reign of Terror, The Rocking Horse Winner, and Samson and Delilah are all films I thought at one point would be on here. Of all of these, Flamingo Road was a sure thing until it wasn’t at the very last minute. Please go watch it.

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#3. Puce Moment (US / Anger) (first-time viewing)
(you can watch the film here. It is just over six minutes.)

Puce Moment is about that slinky diva from Singin’ in the Rain. You know the one — the vamp that never speaks. Every so often she can be seen skulking through the frame with her long cigarette & droopy posture that cries “Exotic!” Kenneth Anger’s short is about the Pola Negri’s, the Alla Nazimova’s, the Greta Garbo’s of the world. Just as Singin’ in the Rain was a love letter to Hollywood and the silent cinema, Puce Moment was about, in Anger’s words, his “love affair with Hollywood, silent film goddesses”, a bygone era where everything was etched in memory as performance and pose.

Bewitching garments of fabric shimmy towards us. A methodical pause is granted to each piece before it moves down the line. This is a fashion show without bodies. Whatever is happening, it’s as if it must be done. A close-up of a woman. She is fully made up, and blazingly modern. She holds fabric to her face. She looks up in ecstasy as the dress is lowered onto her, as if putting on a gift from the gods. Everything is deliberate and practiced. It is a ritual. After all, this is Kenneth Anger, and this was his ritual. This rack of pastel flapper frocks were artifacts belonging to Anger’s costume designer grandmother. When he was a child he would sneak up to her room and put one on in a similar fashion, going through them one-by-one each time.

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It becomes clear that Puce Moment is some kind of witchery. There is a shot of this goddess’s vanity and its compact pastel glamour. I think about playing “Pretty Pretty Princess” as a kid and how this image is exactly what I imagined those worthless pieces of plastic to be. Boudoirs were made for her, and she was made for her lair. She takes time to bask in the act of lounging, existing to exist in this space. Suddenly the couch moves. Then she is outside. It’s different. Being outside demands a purpose. Enter the Borzois! just as exotic as she. There are an irrational amount of them.

Though nothing can meet the process inside, she leaves her fortress in Mount Olympus. She is ready to meet the world with her dogs. It’s not night. It’s the late afternoon, but she must make something of this lazy hour. Who is this all for? For us? For her? Puce Moment is about the presentation of self as its own art form, as represented by the immortal celluloid siren. Today, Lady Gaga practices this publicly (calculated transparency and branding have supplanted mystery. Female pop stars are the only people who have preserved a small piece of what was). She is the diva walking her Borzois. Anger can’t imagine these women any other way. For him, the public self is also imagined to be the private self.

The woman’s movements are halting, as if she’s slightly off balance. While standing still, she wobbles. This is because Anger shot Puce Moment at 8 frames per second, evoking the silent period and planting the film firmly on its own plane of existence. There are other reasons the film feels out of time (but very much not out of place). The original soundtrack featured a piece by Verdi. But 20 years later, after falling out with soon-to-be Manson-ite Bobby Beausoleil over Lucifer Rising, he fled to London, got involved in the rock scene, and in 1970 re-released Puce Moment with a Jonathan Halper song attached to it. His psych ambience reverberates over those visuals as we hear him sing “Yes, I am a hermit”. A psychedelic sound added to a film from the 1940s, about the 1920s and its evocation of the no-longer, that already felt borne out of 1960s counterculture? No wonder the film feels like it exists in some far-off glitter dimension we can otherwise only hope to catch glimpses of in slumber.

Puce Moment is but a fragment, the only fragment, of an intended feature length project called Puce Women. The film would have been made up of different women representing different parts of the day. Instead we get one woman and a slice of something undone. Kenneth Anger uses the short film to go towards Hollywood while others working in this mode, avant-garde outsiders with limited finances, were doing the exact opposite. It feels fitting that Puce Moment is all there is. Its mysterious power remains absolute. It is a spell cast on the viewer, but one manifestation of Anger’s paganism. It is the luxuriant feminine eternally out of reach.

Top Ten By Year: 1949 #4 – The Passionate Friends (UK / Lean)


Previous Top Ten By Year lists:
1935, 1983, 1965, 1943, 1992, 1978, 1925, 1969
1930

Previous Top Ten By Year: 1949 Posts:
Top Ten By Year: 1949 – Poll Results
100 Images from the Films of 1949
What I’ll Remember About the Films of 1949: A Love Letter
#10. The Queen of Spades (UK/Dickinson)
#9. Rendezvous in July (Becker)/Au royaume des cieux (Duvivier) (France)
#8. Too Late for Tears (US / Haskin)
#7. The Heiress (US / Wyler)
#6. The Set-Up (US / Wise)
#5. Caught (US / Ophüls)

For those unaware of my Top Ten By Year project:
The majority of my viewing habits have been dictated by this project since September of 2013. Jumping to a different decade each time, I choose comparatively weaker years for me re: quantity of films seen/quantity of films loved. I use list-making as a way to see more films and revisit others in a structured and project-drive way. I was sick of spending too much time trying to decide what to watch, or watching films just to cross them off another dumb canon list. I wanted to engage. I wanted films to be enhanced by others, by looking at a specific moment in time. I wanted something that led me to seeing or revisiting things I might not have gotten to otherwise. Lastly, my lists are based on personal favorites, not any weird notion of an objective best.

This is the first year I’ll be doing separate posts for each film. #9 will go up Monday. After that, one will go up each day until the end. Then I’ll post them all together so they are gathered in one place. There are a lot of films I loved that did not make the cut. In particular, Flamingo Road, Such a Pretty Little Beach, On the Town, Inspirace, The Reckless Moment, Reign of Terror, The Rocking Horse Winner, and Samson and Delilah are all films I thought at one point would be on here. Of all of these, Flamingo Road was a sure thing until it wasn’t at the very last minute. Please go watch it.

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#4. The Passionate Friends (UK / Lean) (first-time viewing)

Playing image association with David Lean’s The Passionate Friends conjures up a jellyfish and its streamer arms floating weightless in the ocean. Maybe it’s because I cast the image of Mary (Ann Todd) out on the balcony, billowing curtain in the foreground as she says goodbye to a different life once and for all, over the whole film. But there’s more to it than that. That wind and those floating curtains are just part of the visual language Lean uses to represent the life Mary doesn’t choose. There is the gentle ripple of the water, the outstretched tree branches that create particles of shadow, and the impossible majesty of the Swiss Alps. They are all part of the sensuality and openness of nature, the choice not made. The jellyfish is a clumsy descriptor, but maybe it’s fitting that I struggle to describe a film that seems to exist in the ethereal.

The Passionate Friends shows the ways time and memory play off each other in the psyche. Just as the properties of nature have the power to signal shifts in thought, atmosphere and objects can become tickets to elsewhere. The Set-Up uses time in the most confining of ways; the emotional lives of its characters are tethered to what is happening within those fateful seventy-three minutes. The Passionate Friends uses time as a structural and thematic bedrock; the subjectivity of its characters become inextricable from the past and the never-was.

The film confused some viewers when it was released (even for the flashback frenzy of the 40s, this was a lot to take in). We begin in Switzerland and travel back nine years, and then (for a brief time) another nine years. We then follow the same route back; nine years forward, and another nine to Switzerland for the final act. The structure recalls John Stahl’s The Locket, another 1940s film that uses to-and-fro flashbacks. The Locket gets more complicated by shifting perspectives as well as time. But The Passionate Friends not only forgoes most standard flashback cues, it even intercuts moments of imagined conversations and actions as characters traverse through humiliation and regret in the exact moments they are felt.

These forays into the internal both jolt and wash over the characters (and us), as inner lives and the autonomy of human emotion are wont to do. Lean always makes sure that the exterior communicates the interior. In an early scene, Mary sits in the carriage next to her husband, doused in darkness and boxed in by both the frame and the shroud of her veil. Barely visible, she is lost in reflections that hurt. Then we’re in the past, and we can feel the sensuality of nature everywhere. It is so bright; Mary and Steven are young and in love. Sunlight covers them, and branches shade them. Together they create a shimmering screen (seen above) that recalls the curtain of the first still (an image that comes much later in the film), and the veil that envelopes Mary in the carriage. In The Passionate Friends, images call back and signal to each other constantly. The veil is the curtain is the sun and shade. It is all of a piece.

All of a sudden there is a whistling screech as the carriage stops short. We are yanked back to the present the exact moment Mary is. There is no pomp and circumstance, no smooth transition. It is cruel, and we feel the loneliness of that carriage so much more. Compare this to how A Letter to Three Wives initiates flashbacks (also from 1949 with an advanced flashback structure); the autotune distortion of a repeated phrase hypnotizes us into and out of the past. There is the slow blur of the frame, a go-to sign that a flashback is coming our way. Lean doesn’t hand-hold. He wants to put you in the viscous of the emotional. The drift-in and shock-out of memory is faithful to Mary’s state of mind. We are with her — truly with her. The Passionate Friends is full of filmmaking that administers a psychic and emotional immediacy, a surprising early onset example of the discontinuous editing that would be en vogue in decades to come.

The Passionate Friends is a human drama rich enough for me to have seen drastically different takeaways on both its characters and its depiction of love and romance. The Passionate Friends is in that Daisy Kenyon class of “it’s complicated”, a sensual film about unsensual people. A film about repeating choices. There are no easy answers, just a lot of messy and contradictory feelings and desires. It’s not about the kinds of love we like to dream about, though it initially fools you into thinking it is. There is a different kind of love happening here, a sturdier love that sneaks up on both sides of the screen, borne out of epiphanies that have their own kind of beauty.

Mary knowingly gives up love for autonomy, money, and comfort with Howard Justin (Claude Rains). Their marriage is amicable, providing her with the kind of emotional freedom she needs and the finer things she wants. When we first meet her she’s on a plane to Switzerland. She sits in luxury, spoiled by “White bread. Butter. Cream!”. A big bowl of fruit even sneaks into the frame. She is, literally, in the clouds. One could argue this is the most openly passionate she appears in the entire film. This is the life she chose and the life she ultimately wants. There are no external forces preventing Steven and Mary from being together. Howard is not a tyrant. Freedom is always hers, including the choice to leave. She never does.

But every nine years she is destined to almost choose Steven (Trevor Howard), the pleasant professor of humble means. Mary’s trouble is the curse of knowing who you are, and knowing that the love you want isn’t the love for you (“I’ve always been a little hard”). Or thinking that you know that about yourself. Sometimes she seems to hold herself back, as if knowing this about herself has simply closed her off to what is possible. Mary and Steven can only exist in the “what if?”, but her self-assessment seems so absolute as to forbid any warmth in her life. For her, passion means first and foremost a loss of control and selfhood. She needs to belong to herself, an objective for a woman rarely understood today let alone then, and one that positions Mary as an outsider in the world.

How much is there really between Steven and Mary? As with so many romances, their feelings remain strong because they are left unprocessed. What could have been likely remains so much stronger than what would have been. Lean connects them metaphysically; dissolves erase the space between them as they think of each other in their respective solitude. Any time she is in the open air, the memory of Steven surrounds her (even if she doesn’t know it). Despite Lean’s lean (I’ll see myself out) into these romanticisms, The Passionate Friends is not a film about lost love. It’s more about mourning the type of person you long to be but aren’t (and can’t we all relate to that?!). Not being with Steven isn’t necessarily about not being with Steven; it’s about feeling passion and desire but not being able to live by that.

The juxtaposition between the life she chose and the life she didn’t can be seen at the New Year’s Eve ball (the scene always referenced in relation to Phantom Thread). On the ground floor she is seen catching up with her one-time soulmate. It is anarchy; they have to yell their pleasantries at each other, and there are Josef Von Sternberg amounts of balloons and streamers everywhere. In keeping with the spontaneous spirit of the event, they soon get split up. Soon after, we see her up in a box with Howard (Claude Rains is introduced looking like an old-school Count, beginning the film’s sly misdirect of his character). The prince and princess looking down on their subjects have such a different energy from the one below. Not cold, but congenial and removed. She looks down longingly, wanting to be part of the ruckus but knowing she wouldn’t know how. She defines herself as belonging to the lofty box that is lacking. It is not a longing that says “why didn’t I choose that?”. It is a longing that says “why can’t I be like them?”.

Steven may love Mary, but he doesn’t really know her. At one point Mary says to him “you don’t really know me at all”. At another point Howard says to him “you don’t know her”. Mary expresses this again later on, stating “we’re practically strangers to each other”. When he receives a letter from Mary in which she breaks off the relationship, he goes to Howard and accuses him of having made her write the letter. I mean, that’s how it always is in these love stories, isn’t it? The tyrant husband holds his wife prisoner or blackmails her into staying? Hell, that’s what Robert Ryan does to Barbara Bel Geddes in Caught! But there are no conventions of the Gothic or the Doomed Romance here. Just a woman making a choice — the same choice. It doesn’t mean she won’t think and dream of Steven on lonely nights. And it doesn’t mean she’ll never stop wondering about what could have been, and there will always be a sense of something lost.

But Howard does know her, and there are untapped waters between them. Claude Rains starts out as the cuckolded husband (we are teased with riffs on his Notorious character). Then, gradually, he emerges as the film’s true soul (Steven is never afforded much perspective while Howard increasingly is). Lean and Rains fully embody Howard’s intense humiliation and betrayal as he starts to reinterpret his own feelings towards Mary. As his pain turns to rage, hers turns to disorientation. He is driven to deliver two  shocking speeches in opposition to each other. She is driven to the brink by no longer belonging. It all crescendos in a spectacular whirlwind of emotional agony where absolute vulnerability and fate intervened reveal the power to reset. Steven is gone. This isn’t what we expected with who we expected. But like I said, The Passionate Friends belongs in that Daisy Kenyon category of “it’s complicated”.