Movie Poster Highlights: 1982


Previous Movie Poster Highlights: 1925, 19301978

Main sources: Film on Paper, Terry-posters, Chisholm-Larsson Gallery, Emovieposter, Wrong Side of the Art

It’s that time again! The content of my year-specific posts deem that they must come after I’ve watched everything planned for any given year. But two of the traditional Top Ten By Year posts can go up any time: Poster Highlights, and the Poll. I’ve taken to putting up the Poster Highlights when I’m a fourth of the way done with my watchlist, while the Poll goes into effect at the halfway mark. And guess what? I’m 25% done with 1982!

It is so very hard to track down the full range of posters from any given year. There are so many different sites, none of them all-encompassing. Then there’s tracking down the artists. Some of these sites have done a great job doing what they can and crediting artists when possible. Every credit given to an artist in this post comes from having seen the name attributed from one of the above sites. About half of these don’t have credited artists (at least that I was able to find).

So these are my favorite posters for 1982 films. I kept it limited to posters made from the time of release. In the case of the Eastern European posters, many of these were made in the mid -to-late 80’s, and I obviously kept them. But in general I stay away from recently made posters for older films, at least for these posts, because I like to concentrate on poster art from the era itself, seeing how films were being advertised in their day, etc.

So many stand-out posters that aren’t represented, because this is simply a collection of my favorites.

(Disclaimer: the accents are missing from credited names, as it wasn’t possible to copy and paste names into the captions)

I’ll go through these based on the groupings I came up with. The first is posters with the COLORS OF THE RAINBOW, a trend that largely crops up when it comes to sci-fi/fantasy fare.

bysouth
US poster for The Sword and the Sorcerer. Artist: Brian Bysouth
E. Carugati
US poster for Sorceress. Artist: E. Carugati
german_a1_dark_crystal_SG00046_C
German poster for The Dark Crystal. Artist unknown. This is the US poster illustration but I was particularly taken with the way the border fits with the content in this one over other versions.
q_thai
Thai poster for Q: The Winged Serpent. Artist unknown.
tongdee panumas
Thai poster for Tron. Artist: Tongdee Panumas
unknown el cepo
Poster for El Cepo. Artist unknown
last_american_virgin_US_unkonwn
US poster for The Last American Virgin. Artist unknown
italian jimmy_bazilli
Italian poster for Come Back to the Five and Dime, Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean. Artist: Bazilli.
poltergeist_japan_unknown
Japanese poster for Poltergeist 

Speaking of Poltergeist, the now-iconic image of Heather O’Rourke in front of the TV set was very smartly the at its marketing center.

PURPLES AND PINKS AND GENRE, OH MY!

I absolutely love the purple/pink color schemes I found on so many posters for 1982 films. This seems to be a trend in movie posters of the 1980’s. The purple/pink color scheme is applied across many genres, particularly horror.

murder_by_phone unknown
US poster for Murder by Phone. Artist unknown. 
nightwarningposter_unknown
US poster for Night Warning. Artist unknown. Love that this looks like a dollar paperback cover. 
RUNAWAY-NIGHTMARE
US VHS art for Runaway Nightmare. Designer unknown. 

Here are a trio of posters from the film Android. Two of them incorporate the purple/pink scheme. The other one is just rad.

android_ver2 ernster
US poster for Android. Saw credited to Ernster but found no other info
android_joann
US poster for Android. Credited to Joann but found no other info
Android_Hungarian_Andras Felvideki
Hungarian poster for Android. Artist: Andras Felvideki

This poster for The Empire Strikes Back was made specifically for the 1982 re-release so I’m counting it:

tom jung_US rerelease
US poster for the re-release of The Empire Strikes Back. Artist: Tom Jung

Last but not least, this 48 Hrs. poster segues nicely into my next grouping:

Brian Bysouth
US poster for 48 Hrs. Artist: Brian Bysouth.

THE HYPER-DETAILED COMIC-INSPIRED ILLUSTRATION

This would phase out later in the 1980’s, replaced by the photogenic faces populating the movie star resurgence, but I suspect that the combination of high-fantasy, sci-fi, chaotic comedies, and teen flicks (not to mention the muscle-bound hero with a scantily clad woman at his side trope) from the era kept this going a bit longer.

richard hescox
US poster for Swamp Thing. Artist: Richard Hescox
creepshow_jack kamen
US poster for Creepshow. Artist: Jack Kamen
class_of_nineteen_eighty_four_unkonwn
US poster for Class of 1984. Artist unknown. 
class-of-1984-poster_unknown
US poster for Class of 1984. Artist unknown
fast times_UK unknwon
UK poster for Fast Times at Ridgemont High. Artist unknown. 
fast_rod dyer_tie-in poster
Tie-in US poster for Fast Times at Ridgemont High. Artist: Rod Dyer
Megaforce_unknown
US poster for Megaforce. Artist unknown.
NightShift_Mike Hobson_US
US poster for Night Shift. Artist: Mike Hobson
pink_motel_unknown
US poster for Pink Motel. Artist unknown
eye_of_the_evil_dead_luiz dominguez
US poster for Manhattan Baby (aka Eye of the Evil Dead). Artist: Luiz Dominguez

PHOTO COLLAGE

Next up are posters that incorporate photography or stills in some way, either on their own or with other illustrative poster design techniques.

benjamin baltimore
Poster for Identification of a Woman. Design by Benjamin Baltimore
By_design_unknown
US poster for By Design. Artist/designer unknown
Dora-Doralina-cartaz José Luiz Benicio Brazil
Brazilian poster for Dora Doralina. Artist: Jose Luiz Benicio. This is my favorite poster of the entire post. 

im_dancing_as_fast_as_i_can
US poster for I’m dancing as fast as I can. Artist/designer unknown
italian_miss right
Italian poster for Miss Right. Designer unknown
kruddart_uk
UK poster for The Draughtsman’s Contract. Artist/Designer: Kruddart
Querelle_Warhol_Germany
German poster for Querelle. Artist: Andy Warhol

NUDIES, NUDIES, NUDIES. NOTHIN’ BUT NUDIES

Turns out that posters for nudies are some of the greatest things in existence.

COnsenting Adults_unknown
US poster for Consenting Adults. Artist unknown
scoundrels_unknown
US poster for Scoundrels. Artist/designer unknown
playgirl_poster_02
US poster for The Playgirl. Artist unknown. 

These next two posters were done by Tom Tierney. He’s the man credited with making the paper doll famous! Later in life it seems that he made a good amount of posters for X-rated fare. His work makes up some of my favorite posters ever. The Wanda Whips Wall Street poster is my other favorite in this post, and it’s something I’m determined to own and have on my wall as a proper adult.

playgirl_Tierney
US poster for The Playgirl. Artist: Tom Tierney
Wanda_Tom Tierney
US poster for Wanda Whips Wall Street. Artist: Tom Tierney

CZECH POSTERS

As is well known, the Czech and the Polish have a near monopoly on incredible, bizarre, head-turning poster art. Here are some of my favorites.

Jan Jiskra_Czech
Czech poster for Frances. Artist: Jan Jiskra
Jan Tomanek_Czech
Czech poster for Fanny and Alexander. Artist: Jan Tomanek
Stanislav Duda_Czech
Czech poster for Dead Men Don’t Wear Plaid. Artist: Stanislav Duda
Still_Czech_Vlach
Czech poster for Still of the Night. Artist: Zdenek Vlach

POLISH POSTERS

alicja_polish_Andrzej Pagowski
Polish poster for Alicja. Artist: Andrzej Pagowski
Andrzej Pagowski_Polish
Polish poster for Missing. Artist: Andrzej Pagowski 
Jakub Erol_Polish
Polish poster for E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial  Artist: Jakub Erol. I love that E.T. looks like a pervert in this one. 
Lech Majewski_ Marathon Family_Polish
Polish poster for Marathon Family. Artist: Lech Majewski
Ševčík, Vratislav The Racket Polish
Polish poster for The Racket. Artist: Vratislav Sevcik. 
Wieslaw Walkuski_Polish
Polish poster for Spiewy po rosie. Artist: Wieslaw Walkuski 
Wieslaw Walkuski_Polish
Polish poster for Tootsie. Artist: Wieslaw Walkuski
Wlodzimierz Terechowicz_Polish
Polish poster for The Border. Artist: Wlodzimierz Terechowicz

LIPS & A VERONIKA VOSS TRIO

dolinski_bucharest identity card_polish
Polish poster for Bucharest Identity Card. Artist: Dolinski
hungarian_farang
Hungarian poster for Veronika Voss. Artist: Farang
Ševčík, Vratislav
Polish poster for Veronika Voss. Artist: Vratislav Sevcik
veronika_voss_Topazio_US
US poster for Veronika Voss. Artist: Vincent Topazio

THE REST

parasite_unknown
US poster for Parasite. Artist unknown
satans_mistress_poster_01_unknown
US poster for Satan’s Mistress. Artist unknown
tenebre_cesaro don't quote me
Poster for Tenebre. Saw credited to Antonio Cesaro on one site but cannot confirm from more established sources
The Sender_unknown
US poster for The Sender. Artist unknown
draughtsmans_contract_Sparacio
Poster for The Draughtsman’s Contract. Artist: Sparacio 
russian for kaamchor_unknown
Russian poster for Kaamchor. Artist unknown. 
smithereens_german_brumm bar
German poster for Smithereens. Artist: Brumm Bar

Review: The Mill and the Cross (2011, Majewski)


Originally posted on Criterion Cast on December 30th, 2011

There are a multitude of ways in which we as humans deal with the world and the various tragedies that can surround us. There are countless instances in which cultures or societies are taken over by ensuing horrors of all kinds. One way of coping is using art, skill and creativity to depict what one sees with complexity, symbolism and catharsis. Not many films deal with how humans have always used art to cope and reconcile what we experience and see. The Mill and the Cross uses a recent medium to show how an older medium lends itself to creative expression that gives desperately needed meaning to the inconsolable atrocities that can occur.

The Mill and the Cross does this in a most unconventional way that at times feels like a filmed piece of performance art, if not for the carefully mapped out visuals on display. I know very little about Polish director Lech Majewski, but it is apparent that he has considerable experience working in both the theater and with installation pieces.

It is 16th century Flanders where Spain occupies and religious persecution reigns. The film renders art becoming, in the form of Pieter Bruegel’s epic painting “The Way to Cavalry”. The piece is filled to the brim with activity and townsfolk with 500 figures occupying the spatial landscape. Among the acts within the painting there is a representation of Christ’s procession. In the film, we witness the daily subdued goings-on of the people who will be represented in the painting. Among the mundane, atrocities committed by the Spaniards are a regular occurrence and are shown with the same hushed quotidian scrutiny. Bruegel, as played by Rutger Hauer, watches and speaks, describing his painting as we see its various elements come together. Michael York plays his patron and Charlotte Rampling plays Bruegel’s mother and his model for the Virgin Mary.

There are several nameless characters that go about their business, unknowingly contributing their collective experience to the canvas as Bruegel sees it. The film is almost entirely without dialogue, with visuals being the communicative language. This aligns the film with Bruegel’s painting which also, it goes without saying, communicates through its vision. Using different technologies such as green screen and matte backgrounds, The Mill and the Cross transfers how Bruegel saw everything around him and makes it the actual physical text of the film; almost like a spin-off of the painting. But The Mill and the Cross ponders the act of a representation of a representation. Film, by nature, represents but arguably does not present. Using the power of filmic representation, Majewski shows a progressive literalization  of Bruegel’s eventual representation of Flanders in “The Way to Cavalry”.

The point of depicting these characters, nameless and otherwise, is not to get inside their heads. It is to show how environment of people, landscape, circumstance and persecution get filtered by inspiration into timeless expression and catharsis.

The Mill and the Cross is filled with stunning contemplative visuals. As a whole, it is unlike anything else and there is plenty to admire and relish. I preferred the segments without the minimal dialogue. What little there was felt didactic and clunky. The film also felt too forcibly stretched to feature-length. Its a rewarding and beautiful film, but it also strains to keep itself afloat for the entire running time.

The film gets you thinking about how art comes to be with the where, the what and the why. It exists in artistic limbo, inviting us to explore motivations and the surface of historical context. Awkward chunks of execution aside, this is for the most part a bewitching rumination.